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Phytoestrogens

Known as: Plant Estrogens, Plant Estrogen, Estrogens, Plant 
Compounds derived from plants, primarily ISOFLAVONES that mimic or modulate endogenous estrogens, usually by binding to ESTROGEN RECEPTORS.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2019
Review
2019
Dietary guidelines universally advise adherence to plant-based diets. Plant-based foods confer considerable health benefits… Expand
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Review
2018
Review
2018
ABSTRACTTrillions of microbes inhabit the human gut, not only providing nutrients and energy to the host from the ingested food… Expand
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Review
2018
Review
2018
Berberine-containing plants have been traditionally used in different parts of the world for the treatment of inflammatory… Expand
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Review
2018
Review
2018
Hop (Humulus lupulus L.), as a key ingredient for beer brewing, is also a source of many biologically active molecules. A notable… Expand
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Review
2018
Review
2018
  • P. Basu, C. Maier
  • Biomedicine & pharmacotherapy = Biomedecine…
  • 2018
  • Corpus ID: 52844479
Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related morbidity and mortality among women worldwide. Phytoestrogens, plant… Expand
Review
2018
Review
2018
Soy is a basic food ingredient of traditional Asian cuisine used for thousands of years. In Western countries, soybeans have been… Expand
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Review
2018
Review
2018
Kidney stones are one of the oldest known and common diseases in the urinary tract system. Various human studies have suggested… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
The rat, mouse and human estrogen receptor (ER) exists as two subtypes, ERα and ERβ, which differ in the C-terminal ligand… Expand
Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
The rat, mouse and human estrogen receptor (ER) exists as two subtypes, ER alpha and ER beta, which differ in the C-terminal… Expand
Review
1998
Review
1998
  • K. Setchell
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 1998
  • Corpus ID: 6287217
The importance of estrogens in homeostatic regulation of many cellular and biochemical events is well illustrated by the… Expand
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