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Frequently Asked Questions

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About

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What is the advantage of using Semantic Scholar instead of other academic search engines?

Semantic Scholar is a free, AI-powered search and discovery tool that helps researchers discover and understand scientific literature that's most relevant to their work.

Semantic Scholar uses machine learning techniques to extract meaning and identify connections from within papers, then surfaces these insights to help scholars gain an in-depth understanding quickly.

Our mission is to accelerate scientific breakthroughs by using AI to help scholars locate and understand the right research, make important connections, and overcome information overload.

If you're a new user, check out our tutorials.

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Does Semantic Scholar offer programmatic access to its data through an API or downloadable dataset?

Semantic Scholar is committed to supporting high-impact research and engineering by providing universities and organizations with access to our data.

For information about programmatic access to Semantic Scholar's data, please visit:

We request that any published research using this data provides proper citing.

Additionally, please visit our Research page to view projects that contribute to some of the features you use on Semantic Scholar. Below each project are links to papers, demos, and GitHub repositories that host datasets, software, and code.

We're continuously improving programmatic access to Semantic Scholar's data. If you'd like to stay up-to-date with new features, please subscribe to our Developer Updates in your account subscriptions at https://www.semanticscholar.org/me/account/email.

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How many articles does Semantic Scholar currently index?

Our corpus is constantly expanding. See the search bar to get the current number of articles.

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I would like permission to use, publish, or distribute part of a paper for my work.

In order to obtain permission to use, publish, or distribute any part of a paper listed on our site, please contact the author or publisher directly.

Semantic Scholar is an academic search engine and we are unable to provide the proper permissions on behalf of the authors and publishers whose content is discoverable on our site.

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Which browsers does Semantic Scholar support?

We support the latest versions of the most popular browsers including desktop and mobile versions of Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Edge, Google Chrome, Apple Safari, and Opera. If you discover an issue in your browser, please contact us.

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Is Semantic Scholar available as a mobile application?

We currently do not have a smartphone app, but www.semanticscholar.org is designed to be easily accessed on both desktop and mobile devices.

Mobile features include Semantic Swipe, a new way to view a list of papers on your phone or tablet. When accessing Semantic Scholar from a mobile device you will see a Try Semantic Swipe button on our search results page, on author pages, and on your Research Feed. Simply tap the button to launch the prototype and start swiping. If you want to save a paper to read later, you'll be prompted to sign in or create an account.

Please tell us if you have any issues using the site on your mobile device.

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How do I send feedback regarding my Semantic Scholar experience?

If you’d like to share your feedback, send us a message.

We also invite you to join our Beta Program to help us shape the future of scholarly research and to get exclusive access to new features.

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Does Semantic Scholar support any claims made within research papers found on the site?

Semantic Scholar does not endorse or support any claims made within any papers currently available on the site. As an academic search engine and discovery tool, Semantic Scholar is not engaged in any editorial decisions in the publishing process.

The goal of Semantic Scholar is to leverage AI research and engineering to utilize methods from data mining, natural-language processing, and computer vision to help researchers discover and understand scientific papers.

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What is a "Beta" feature?

A Beta feature is one that we make available early while our engineers are still actively working on it. Beta features often still have rough edges and continue to evolve quickly, and we especially welcome feedback on them.

To get exclusive access to new features and to help us shape the future of scholarly research, we invite you to join our Beta Program.

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What is a TLDR?

A TLDR is an AI-generated summarization for a scientific paper that helps researchers quickly determine the key important aspects of a paper. These extreme paper summaries are an alternative to abstracts, intended to help researchers navigate and understand scientific literature easily and efficiently.

TLDRs are currently limited to the computer science and biomedical domains. If you find this feature helpful and would like us to expand coverage to your domain, please let us know.

To find out more about TLDRs, see our TLDR page, try our demo, or read the paper on Semantic Scholar.

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How does Semantic Scholar support libraries?

For information on how Semantic Scholar can help your researchers, please visit our Librarian Resources page.

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How does Semantic Scholar determine a paper’s Field of Study?

Semantic Scholar assigns Field of Study using a machine learning classification model based on a paper’s title and abstract. A paper may be assigned up to three Fields of Study. 

Field of Study classification is currently limited to English-language papers. It is most reliable when both title and abstract are available, but works on just titles as well. If a paper’s title is too ambiguous, it may not be assigned any Field of Study. 

To learn more about Field of Study classification on Semantic Scholar, see our blog post.

Account

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What are the benefits of creating an account?

Creating a Semantic Scholar account enables you to:

  • Create email alerts for new papers.
  • Generate research feeds for new paper recommendations.
  • Save papers that you'd like to revisit in a library.
  • Claim an author page so you can better manage your author details and papers.

Please note that you do not need to create an account to access papers on Semantic Scholar.

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How do I create an account on Semantic Scholar?

To create a Semantic Scholar account:

  1. Visit any page on the Semantic Scholar site at www.semanticscholar.org.
  2. In the top right corner, select Create Free Account.
  3. In the pop-up window, select how you’d like to create an account using your institutional email, Google, Facebook, Twitter, or your email and password.
  4. Enter your sign-in credentials.

Please note that Semantic Scholar does not collect any sign-in information such as username or password. You do not need to create an account to access papers on Semantic Scholar.

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How do I sign in with my institution?

Semantic Scholar partners with Open Athens to provide a privacy-focused institutional sign-in option.

To see if your institution is currently supported, select Sign In with Your Institution during sign-in or when creating a free account and search for your organization.

When signed in with your institution, you can access full-text articles that your institution subscribes to. For more details, see How do I access a PDF using my institutional affiliation?

If you're experiencing issues signing in with your institutional email or if your institution is not listed, please let us know.

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I'm having trouble signing in to my Semantic Scholar account.

If you're having trouble signing in to your account, send us a message with the following information so we may help you recover your account:

  • Email addresses you may have used to create your account
  • Whether you have claimed an author page
  • Name
  • Affiliation

Semantic Scholar does not collect sign-in information.

  • If you created an account using your Google, Twitter, or Facebook credentials, see their password recovery options.
  • If you created an institutional account, contact our institution.
  • If you created an account using an email address and password, select the Forgot Password link on the Sign In page.
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I forgot my password and I cannot sign in.

Semantic Scholar does not collect emails and passwords.

If you created an account using a sign-in provider such as Google, Twitter, Facebook, or your institution, please reach out to the sign-in provider you used when creating your account.

If you did not create your account using any of our sign-in providers, select the Forgot Password link and follow the prompts.

If you're not sure which sign-in provider you used to create your account, reach out to us.

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How do I manage my email preferences?

To manage your email preferences:

  1. Sign in to your Semantic Scholar account.
  2. Under 'Account' in the top right corner, select Settings from the dropdown menu.
  3. Under 'Settings,' go to Contact Preferences.
  4. From here, you can disable any existing subscription by sliding the toggle next to the listed options. You may also select Unsubscribe from all subscriptions if you no longer wish to receive updates.

You can also access and edit your alert preferences by selecting the Manage Preferences link located in the footer of the emails you receive from Semantic Scholar.

Alerts

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What is the benefit of receiving email alerts from Semantic Scholar?

Creating email alerts helps to stay up-to-date on authors, papers, and topics in your field of study. Email alerts are a tool for tracking the latest developments in your field and enable you to survey and assess the impact of research available on Semantic Scholar.

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What type of alerts does Semantic Scholar offer?
  • Author Alerts: New citations and papers for a specific author to assess the author’s impact.
  • Paper Alerts: New citations for a specific paper to keep track of how it is impacting related research.
  • Topic Alerts: New papers that mention a research topic to stay up-to-date on the latest papers in a given research field.
  • Research Feed Alerts: New papers based on your Research Feed ratings.
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How do I create an alert?

To create a new alert for an author, visit the author page for the author you’re interested in. In the left panel below the author's name, select Create Alert. Choose whether you wish to create an alert for new citations or newly published papers for that author. Confirm by selecting Create Alert.

To create an alert for a paper or topic, visit the paper or topic page you’re interested in. Select Create Alert located below the paper abstract or select Create Alert located below the topic description.

When you create a research feed, you will automatically receive email alerts once you rate five relevant papers with More Like This and three non-relevant papers with Less Like This.

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How do I edit my alert preferences?

To edit your alerts preferences:

  1. Sign in to your Semantic Scholar account.
  2. Under 'Account' in the top right corner, select Settings from the dropdown menu.
  3. Under 'General Settings,' select Alert Preferences.
  • Select Alert Email Address to specify where you would like to receive email alerts. Any email address you enter will need to go through a verification process before you will receive alerts.
  • Choose your Alert Frequency by selecting 'Once a Day' or 'Once a Week.'
  • To enable or disable an existing alert, click the sliding icon to the left of the alert title. If enabled, the toggle will be blue. If disabled, the toggle will be gray. To delete an existing alert entirely, click the X icon to the right of the alert.

You can also access and edit your alert preferences by selecting the Manage Alerts link located at the bottom of your alert emails.

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How do I enable, disable or delete existing alerts?

To enable, disable or delete existing alerts:

  1. Sign in to your account using the sign-in link in the top right corner.
  2. Under 'Account' in the top right corner, select Settings from the dropdown menu.
  3. Under 'General Settings,' select Alert Preferences.
  4. To enable or disable an existing alert, click the sliding icon to the left of the alert title. If enabled, the toggle will be blue. If disabled, the toggle will be gray. To delete an existing alert entirely, click the X to the right of the alert.

Note: You can also access and edit your alert preferences by selecting the Manage Alerts link located at the bottom of your alert emails.

If you have any issues managing your alerts, please let us know.

Citations

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How does Semantic Scholar calculate citation counts?

Semantic Scholar automatically identifies citing papers for each publication based on the data available in our corpus. Note: Published academic articles and preprints  are our primary focus. Book coverage is very limited and patents are not included. Because of this, you may notice differences in counts when comparing against other websites.

Our site features over two billion citations and we’re continuously working to add citation data through enhanced PDF extraction models and publisher partnerships. With new content added on a daily basis, citation counts will continue to increase.

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How does Semantic Scholar calculate H-index?

Semantic Scholar's h-index is calculated using citation data based on the publications and citations currently discoverable on semanticscholar.org. Because of this, you may notice differences in scores when comparing against other websites. Note: Our corpus currently focuses on published academic articles and preprints; book coverage is very limited and patents are not included. Also, some publishers do not openly share reference data (visit I4OC to advocate for the open sharing of reference data).

Important: An h-index should be used as a single indicator only and not as a comprehensive and comparative measure of overall scientific impact. Due to variations in publication and citation rates across fields and because the h-index does not account for career progression, Semantic Scholar does not recommend using the h-index for comparative analysis or research assessment.

If you think your h-index does not accurately represent your work on Semantic Scholar, please let us know.

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What are Highly Influential Citations?

Semantic Scholar identifies citations where the cited publication has a significant impact on the citing publication, making it easier to understand how publications build upon and relate to each other. Influential citations are determined utilizing a machine-learning model analyzing a number of factors including the number of citations to a publication, and the surrounding context for each. You can read more about our approach in “Identifying Meaningful Citations”.

Note: Identification as highly influential relies on our access to the full-text of the citing paper. Our publisher partnerships and open access PDF extraction provide strong coverage; however, some influential papers may not be designated as such due full-text access limitations.

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What is Citation Velocity?

Citation Velocity is a weighted average of the publication’s citations for the last 3 years and fewer for publications published in the last year or two, which indicates how popular and lasting the publication is.

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What is Citation Acceleration?

Citation acceleration measures the change in a publication’s citation velocity over time, indicating whether the number of citations for a publication is increasing or decreasing. We divide the change in citation velocity over the last two years to calculate citation acceleration.

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What is Citation Intent?

Citation intents make it easier for researchers to navigate and discover research while browsing our citation graph. We categorize citation intents into three different types; Background, Method and Result Extension.

  • Background citations provide historical context, justification of importance, and/or additional information directly related to that which exists in a cited paper.
  • Method citations use the previously established procedures or experiments to determine whether the results are consistent with findings in related studies.
  • Result citations extend on findings from research that was previously conducted.

Note: citation intent data is limited to papers for which we have access to the full text.

If you'd like to learn more about how we're identifying citation intent in scholarly literature, visit “Structural Scaffolds for Citation Intent Classification in Scientific Publications”.

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How do I cite publications that I find on Semantic Scholar?

To cite any papers that you find on Semantic Scholar, select Cite below the title and authors listed on a paper page or in the search results. A pop-up will offer you the option of multiple citation formats including BibTex, MLA, APA or Chicago. If there’s a citation format you’d like that we don’t offer, please let us know.

To download an EndNote .enw file, select EndNote.

To import a citation using a reference management software browser plugin such as Zotero Connector or Mendeley Web Importer, navigate to the paper's page in Semantic Scholar and then select your reference manager's extension in your browser. Please note that when using Zotero Connector, you may need to refresh the paper's page to enable importing.

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Does Semantic Scholar display the online publication date or the print publication date?

Semantic Scholar displays either the print or online publication date depending on metadata that's provided by the source.

We realize there are varying strategies around which date to display because of potential impact on citations, annual research evaluations, and in publishing competing research. If you believe Semantic Scholar is not displaying the correct publication date, please reach out to us.

If you'd like to suggest your preference for how to display publication dates for your research, please tell us.

Content

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Where does Semantic Scholar source papers from?

Semantic Scholar sources its content via web indexing and from partnerships with scientific journals, indexes, and content providers. You can find a list of our sources by visiting our publisher partners page.

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What types of content do you include in Semantic Scholar?

Our current corpus includes research publications in all fields of science. We index content from a number of leading scientific publishers and indexes such as PubMed, arXiv, Springer Nature, and more.

Coverage is focused on journal articles. If you would like see other types of content such as books, datasets, or patents, please contact us.

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How do I access the full text of a paper?

When you find a paper you’re interested in reading, you will find access options below the abstract of the paper located on the paper detail page.

If we have an available link to a paper or PDF, you will see options to View PDF, View Paper, or View via Publisher below the abstract. The 'View' options will re-direct you to a full-text PDF or to the publisher source where you may find the best options for accessing the paper. If the paper is not freely accessible, you may be directed to a publisher website with options to purchase a paper.

If you see 'No Paper Link Available' below the abstract, we do not have a source link and information is limited to the paper title and other metadata on the page.

Note: Semantic Scholar has partnered with Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) and LibKey to provide direct access to subscription-based articles that your institution has access to. For more information, see How do I access a PDF using my institutional affiliation?.

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How do I access a PDF using my institutional affiliation?

Semantic Scholar provides access to full-text articles that your institution subscribes to through our Get Full Text Research (GetFTR) and LibKey integration via our institutional sign-in option. Currently, we work with Open Athens, eduGAIN, and InCommon to provide an institutional sign-in.

To gain access, under Create Account in the upper right corner, select Sign Up With Your Institution. If your institution is not yet supported, please let us know.

Once you're signed in to Semantic Scholar using your institutional email, find a paper you're interested in and click through to the paper page.

  • If the publisher is a GetFTR partner and if your institution has a subscription, an Access PDF via Institution button is displayed below the abstract.
  • If the publisher is not a GetFTR partner, an Access PDF via LibKey button is displayed, which leads you through the LibKey workflow.

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How do I index my papers in Semantic Scholar?

If you are an author who would like to see your content in Semantic Scholar, you can submit papers with publicly accessible PDFs for indexing once you've successfully claimed your author page.

We will do our best to ensure your paper is added. Please note, however, that Semantic Scholar sources the majority of papers from our partners and differs from paper sharing sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu. Our indexing process is fully automated and we cannot guarantee that our web crawler and PDF extraction process will successfully index your paper.

To submit an index request:

  1. Visit your author page settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Settings from the dropdown menu under Account in the top right corner.
  2. In your author page settings, select Add Papers.
  3. Search for your paper. If your paper is not discoverable on Semantic Scholar, at the bottom of the search results select Add a paper that does not exist in our corpus.
  4. Paste a link to a publicly accessible PDF of your paper from an open access source.
  5. Select Add to add the PDF link. Note: If you have additional papers, paste a PDF link and select Add for each paper you wish to submit.
  6. Select Submit at the bottom of the page to submit the PDF link(s) for processing. Note: 'Status of Changes' does not currently display your submitted PDF index requests.

For new paper index requests, please allow 2 weeks for processing. We will do our best to ensure your paper is added.

We are unable to add papers without publicly accessible PDFs, non-academic papers, copyright protected content, or papers that require a login to access. We are also unable to add papers from sites like ResearchGate, Academia.edu, Google Scholar, and SSRN at this time.

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I submitted my paper for indexing but I'm unable to find it on semanticscholar.org.

We do our best to ensure your paper is added. Please note, however, that Semantic Scholar sources the majority of papers from our partners and differs from paper sharing sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu. We cannot guarantee that our web crawler and PDF extraction process will successfully index your paper.

Our indexing systems are automated and may sometimes filter out papers for the following reasons:

  • The PDF was not formatted as an academic paper.
  • The PDF was not parsable or the PDF was not discoverable by our web crawler.
  • The site hosting your PDF did not allow web crawlers.
  • The site hosting your PDF is programmed using JavaScript, which can sometimes be difficult for our crawlers to navigate.
  • Access to the PDF required a login or subscription. For this reason, we are unable to index papers on sites such as ResearchGate and Academia.edu.
  • The publishing source is not currently supported according to our indexing policies. Please ensure that your paper is hosted by one of our approved publishing sources, or is an open-access and peer-reviewed paper from a Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) listed journal.
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How do I remove a paper from Semantic Scholar?

If you'd like to request that a PDF or paper be removed from the Semantic Scholar site, please contact us with the URL to the paper on Semantic Scholar along with the reason for your request.

If your paper has been clustered together with another author's papers on an author page, you can claim the page and remove the paper from your page. If you prefer not to claim the page, contact us with the URL to the paper on Semantic Scholar and we will remove the paper from the author page.

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What is the process for indexing a journal in Semantic Scholar's corpus?

We are delighted to index journals included in the Directory of Open Access Journals.

If you would like your journal to be indexed in Semantic Scholar, please visit the Directory of Open Access Journals website and apply.

Once your journal application has been processed and approved, please send us a link to your journal on the DOAJ website and we will gladly submit a request to index.

If you have any questions while your application is being processed, please let us know.

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Do you provide papers that are behind paywalls?

We provide open access options where available; however, some articles are only available on the publisher's site behind paywalls.

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Does Semantic Scholar include papers in other languages than English?

We currently focus on publications primarily in English, but we hope to support other languages in the future.

If there’s a specific language you would like us to consider, please tell us.

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What is a Lit Review and how do you determine that a paper is an overview?

Lit reviews are papers that provide a survey or high-level explanation of a field or topic. Our system utilizes a series of heuristics to determine if a paper is classified as an overview by analyzing the document’s content and wording.

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I’d like to have an author page on Semantic Scholar. What can I do?

Author pages are created automatically. Once Semantic Scholar discovers a publicly accessible publication on the internet, metadata is then extracted from the publication source and an author page is automatically created based on that metadata.

If you have academic publications available online but don’t see them on our site, please send us a link to a publicly accessible PDF of your publication and we’d be to submit an index request. We will do our best to ensure your paper is added. Please note, however, that Semantic Scholar sources the majority of papers from our partners and differs from paper sharing sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu. Our indexing process is fully automated and we cannot guarantee that our web crawler and PDF extraction process will successfully index your paper.

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How does Semantic Scholar determine a paper’s Field of Study?

Semantic Scholar assigns Field of Study using a machine learning classification model based on a paper’s title and abstract. A paper may be assigned up to three Fields of Study. 

Field of Study classification is currently limited to English-language papers. It is most reliable when both title and abstract are available, but works on just titles as well. If a paper’s title is too ambiguous, it may not be assigned any Field of Study. 

To learn more about Field of Study classification on Semantic Scholar, see our blog post.

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How do I open PDF files in a new tab rather than automatically download?

Papers may automatically be downloaded to your device based on your browser settings. To prevent automatically downloading PDF files you click on, visit your browser settings to select your preferences for opening PDF files.

For Firefox, you can find these instructions here.

Corrections

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I’ve noticed an error in the author name on an article. How do I correct it?

If you notice an author correction needed on Semantic Scholar, there are a couple of ways to resolve this:

If an author page has been generated for you, you may submit a request to claim your author page. Claiming your author page enables you to add and remove papers from your author page and edit your authorship details.

If you do not yet have an author page on Semantic Scholar, let us know and we will make the necessary corrections.

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Why is there an error in the authors listed on my paper?

Due to the nature of citation formats, authors sharing similar names can provide a challenge for Semantic Scholar’s author disambiguation model. In June 2021, we introduced S2AND, our new author disambiguation model.

Read more about the model at S2AND: A Benchmark and Evaluation System for Author Name Disambiguation. The algorithm and evaluation suite are publicly available on Github.

Please note that errors may still occur. The most effective way to ensure your author page is accurate is to claim your author page and use our correction tools to add and remove papers.

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I’ve noticed an error in the metadata for my paper. How do I correct it?

If you see an error in your paper's metadata, please let us know.

Please include information about what type of correction is required.

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How long does it take for corrections to be reflected?

After we have responded to your request or if you are an author who has submitted corrections through your author page, please allow 24 hours for your corrections to be processed.

If your corrections aren't displayed on the site after 24 hours, please let us know.

Claim Author Page

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How are author pages created?

Semantic Scholar automatically creates author pages based on data aggregated from public sources and our publisher partners.

Pages are generated from an A.I. author disambiguation model developed in house by our team of researchers and engineers. For more information, see:

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How do I claim my author page?

To find your author page, search for your name in the search bar and then select your name in the results. Alternatively, you can search by a paper's title and then click your hyperlinked name in the author list. If your name is not yet linked, please contact us.

When you are on your author page, select Claim Author Page below your name in the left panel. Please provide supporting information to help our team moderate your claim:

  • Email
  • Full name
  • Current role
  • Field of study
  • Affiliation, ORCID, and homepage
  • Any additional information you think could help our team make a confident decision for your claim.

Claims are typically moderated more quickly if you submit your claim using an email address that is referenced within your papers.

Once your claim is approved, you will receive a confirmation by email with a link to edit your author page. By claiming your author page you can:

  • Update your name to be displayed on the page
  • Add Affiliation(s)
  • Add Homepage
  • Add ORCiD
  • Add papers to your author page
  • Remove papers from your author page
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How do I find my Semantic Scholar Author ID?

When you submit a paper to a conference, the submission system may request your Semantic Scholar ID. A Semantic Scholar ID is used solely to help conference organizers assign reviewers to your paper by a) detecting conflict of interest based on co-author relationships and b) computating a matching score between a reviewer and a submission's topic based on the reviewer's publication history. A Semantic Scholar ID is optional if you have not published any previous papers.

To find your Semantic Scholar ID:

  1. Find your author page using the search bar on www.semanticscholar.org.
    • Search by author name: Enter the name you publisher under. In the search results select the author tile that includes the majority of your papers. Note: To expand the tile section, select Show All Authors.
    • Search by paper title: Enter your paper's title. In the search results click your hyperlinked name in the author list. Note: If your name is not yet hyperlinked to an author page, contact us.
  2. On your author page, your Semantic Scholar ID is the numerical string at the end of the URL. Example: For www.semanticscholar.org/author/1741101, the Semantic Scholar ID is 1741101.

If you would like to add or remove papers from your author page or update your name, you can claim your page by selecting the Claim Author Page button below your name. To ensure that your claim is approved, include supporting information such as your affiliation, field of study, ORCiD and home page in the claim form.

If you need assistance finding your author page, contact us.

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How is my author page claim moderated?

Once you submit your claim request, a member of our support team will individually evaluate the information you provided in order to validate your identity.

We use this information and cross-reference it with our records to confirm that your information matches the information associated with the author page.

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How do I submit corrections to my author page?

To submit corrections to your author page, visit your author page settings. When signed in to your account, you can find these settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your ResearchDashboard. You will be directed to a page where you can edit your author details:

  • Display Information: Update the name to be displayed on your page, addd your affiliation(s), add your homepage, or add your ORCiD.
  • Remove Papers: Remove papers that you did not author. For detailed guidance, see How do I remove papers from my author page?
  • Add Papers: Add papers that are missing from your author page. For detailed guidance, see How do I add papers to my author page?
  • Status of Changes: A display of your edits. Please allow 24 hours for edits to be processed. Note: Index requests are not yet displayed on this page.

If you experience any difficulties managing your author page, please reach out to us.

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How do I add papers to my author page?

If your paper is discoverable on Semantic Scholar, you can add it to your claimed author page.

  1. Visit your author page settings. When signed in to your account, you can find these settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your Research Dashboard.
  2. Select Add Papers in the navigation panel to the left.
  3. Add paper a paper by pasting the URL to the Semantic Scholar paper detail page in the search bar. You can also search by entering your paper title.
  4. Once you’ve found the paper you’d like to add, select the paper title and then select one of the following methods for your request.
    • Add me to the author list
    • Replace an existing author with me
    • The author is correct, but the paper is missing from my author page
  5. In the lower right corner, click Submit.

If your paper is not yet discoverable on Semantic Scholar, you can submit a paper for indexing if the PDF is publicly accessible.

We will do our best to ensure your paper is added. Please note, however, that Semantic Scholar sources the majority of papers from our partners and differs from paper sharing sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu. Our indexing process is fully automated and we cannot guarantee that our web crawler and PDF extraction process will successfully index your paper.

To submit an index request:

  1. Visit your author page settings. When signed in to your account, you can find these settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from author panel on your Research Dashboard.
  2. In your author page settings, select Add Papers.
  3. Search for your paper. If your paper is not discoverable on Semantic Scholar, at the bottom of the search results select Add a paper that does not exist in our corpus.
  4. Paste a link to a publicly accessible PDF of your paper from an open access source.
  5. Select Add to add the PDF link. Note: If you have additional papers, paste a PDF link and select Add for each paper you wish to submit.
  6. Select Submit at the bottom of the page to submit the PDF link(s) for processing.

For new paper index requests, please allow 2 weeks for processing.

We are unable to add papers without a publicly accessible PDF, non-academic papers, copyright protected content, or papers that require a login to access. We are also unable to add papers from ResearchGate, Academia.edu, SSRN, and Google Scholar at this time.

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How do I index papers missing from my author page?

If your paper is not yet discoverable on Semantic Scholar, you can submit a paper for indexing if the PDF is publicly accessible once you've successfully claimed your author page.

We will do our best to ensure your paper is added. Please note, however, that Semantic Scholar sources the majority of papers from our partners and differs from paper sharing sites like ResearchGate and Academia.edu. Our indexing process is fully automated and we cannot guarantee that our web crawler and PDF extraction process will successfully index your paper.

To submit an index request:

  1. Visit your author page settings. When signed in to your account, you can find these settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your ResearchDashboard.
  2. In your author page settings, select 'Add Papers'.
  3. Search for your paper. If your paper is not discoverable on Semantic Scholar, at the bottom of the search results select Add a paper that does not exist in our corpus.
  4. Paste a link to a publicly accessible PDF of your paper from an open access source.
  5. Select Add to add the PDF link. Note: If you have additional papers, paste a PDF link and select Add for each paper you wish to submit.
  6. Select Submit at the bottom of the page to submit the PDF link(s) for processing.

For new paper index requests, please allow 2 weeks for processing. We will do our best to ensure your paper is added.

We are unable to index papers without a publicly accessible PDF, non-academic papers, copyright protected content, or papers that require a login to access. We are also unable to add papers from social sites like ResearchGate, Academia.edu, Google Scholar, and SSRN at this time.

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How do I remove papers from my author page?

If a paper has been misattributed to you, you can remove it to ensure your list of papers is accurate and representative of your work.

  1. Visit your author page settings. When signed in to your account, you can find these settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your ResearchDashboard.
  2. From the left navigation panel, select Remove Papers.
  3. Searching or scrolling through the list to find the paper(s) that you’d like to remove.
  4. Select the X to the left of the paper title, then click Submit.

You can perform this for multiple papers at one time and you can undo any removal before submitting.

Please note that removing papers from your author page does not remove them from the Semantic Scholar site. If you would like to request your papers be removed from Semantic Scholar, please send us a link to the paper you'd like to have removed and provide a reason for the removal.

If you experience any difficulties or if you would like assistance, please let us know.

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How do I merge multiple author pages?

We don't yet have a tool that enables authors to merge author pages, but we can merge pages for you or you can add papers yourself using the 'Add Papers' tool in your author page settings. Important: Please do not submit a claim for more than one author page.

If the majority of papers on multiple author pages are authored by you, please contact us with the URLs of the pages to be merged.

If a few of your papers are on another author page, you can add these papers to your claimed page using the 'Add Papers' tool in your author page settings.

  1. Visit your author page settings. When signed in to your account, you can find these settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your Research Dashboard.
  2. Select Add Papers in the navigation panel to the left.
  3. Add paper a paper by pasting the URL to the Semantic Scholar paper detail page in the search bar. You can also search by entering your paper title.
  4. Once you’ve found the paper you’d like to add, select the paper title and then select one of the following methods for your request.
    • Add me to the author list
    • Replace an existing author with me
    • The author is correct, but the paper is missing from my author page
  5. In the lower right corner, click Submit.
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How long does it take for the changes to be reflected on my author page?

Once you submit a request to update your author details or to add or remove papers, please allow 24 hours before they are displayed on your author page.

If your changes aren't displayed on the site after 24 hours, please let us know.

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How do I unclaim an author page?

To unclaim an author page, first ensure that you're signed in to your account.

  1. When signed in to your account, you can find your author page settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your Research Dashboard.
  2. From the left panel, select Display Information.
  3. Scroll to the bottom left corner of the page and select Unclaim Author Page. When you refresh your browser, you'll see that the page is no longer claimed.

If you experience any issues unclaiming an author page, please let us know.

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How do I access the information displayed on my author page?

Once you've successfully claimed your author page, you can access your author information in the author page settings.

When signed in to your account, you can access your author page settings by selecting Edit Author Page on your claimed author page or by selecting Edit Author Page from your author page panel on your Research Dashboard.

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What happens when a new paper of mine is added to Semantic Scholar’s corpus?

Once a new paper is added to our corpus, we will attempt to map it to the most appropriate author page and automatically add it the page.

To be notified by email when a new paper is added to your author page, sign in to your account on desktop and select Create Alert below your name on our author page. Then you can select the type and frequency. We recommend signing up for both paper and citation alerts.

If you notice that a new paper has not been automatically added to your claimed author page, please see "How do I add papers to my author page?".

Feel free to let us know if you need assistance or would like to give us feedback.

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Can I edit my claimed author page on Semantic Scholar's mobile site?

Currently, we only support author page editing on desktop. If you would like the ability to edit your claimed author page on your mobile device, please tell us.

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How do I set my pronouns and why?

Set your pronouns on the Display information page. This feature allows authors to represent themselves how they choose. Since this data will be publicly available, Semantic Scholar and/or others could use it for science-of-science inquiries, e.g. understanding the demographics of science authorship.

Library

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What is the benefit of using the Library?

Our Library allows you to store and organize papers in one place. Saving papers to your Library enables you to:

  • Easily revisit any saved paper when signed in to your Semantic Scholar account.
  • Organize saved papers into customized folders.
  • Bulk export citations.
  • Create AI-powered Research Feeds based on a Library folder to keep you up to date on the latest research.
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How do I save a paper to my Library?

To save a paper to your Library, select the Save to Library option on the paper page or select Save in the list of actions below the paper title.

Note: When a paper is saved, "In Library" is displayed.

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How do I remove a paper from my Library?

There are two ways to remove a paper from your Library.

  1. From your Library, select the Remove option in the list of actions below the paper title and abstract.
  2. From a paper, select In Library. In the lower right corner of the slide out, select Remove Paper From Library.
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How do I create a new folder in my Library?

Folders are designed to help you organize your saved papers. There are two ways you can create a new folder in your Library.

  1. From your Library, select the Add New Folder option from the bottom of your folder list. A field will appear enabling you to enter a name for your folder.
  2. From a paper, select Save To Library. From the slide out, select Add New Folder and enter a folder name in the field provided. Note: To save the paper in this folder, select the folder and then Save & Close.
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How do I edit or delete a folder in my Library?

To edit or delete a folder in your Library, hover over the folder name in your folder list and select the pencil icon. A slide out will appear where you can edit the name of the selected folder or delete the folder

To edit the name of the selected folder, re-enter a name, then select Save & Close.

To delete the folder, select Delete Folder.

Please note that deleting a folder will not remove the papers saved to that folder but rather, the papers will be moved to "Unsorted Papers" where you may re-assign them or remove them from your Library.

You can find "Unsorted Papers" in the panel to the left of the papers saved in your Library.

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How do I add a saved paper to a folder in my Library?

Saving a paper to a folder in your Library allows you to easily organize collections of papers.

Select Save To Library from any paper page or Save in the list of actions below the paper title. A slide out will appear enabling you add the paper to an existing folder(s) or create a new folder.

To add the paper to an existing folder, select the folder(s) you wish to save the paper to, then Save & Close.

To add the paper to a new folder, select Add New Folder and enter a name in the field provided. To save the paper in this folder, select the folder in the folder list, then Save & Close.

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How do I remove a paper from a folder in my Library?

To remove a paper from a folder in your Library, find the paper in your Library, then select the folder icon in the list of actions below the paper title and abstract. You can use the search box to help you narrow your search.

A slide out will appear enabling you to move the paper to another folder by clicking the checkbox provided or remove it from all folders by deselecting all checkboxes.

Once you remove a paper from a folder, it will automatically be moved to the "Unsorted Papers" section of your Library.

You can find "Unsorted Papers" in the panel to the left of the papers saved in your Library.

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How do I export papers from my Library?

To export records from your Library:

  1. In the top right corner, sign in to your Semantic Scholar account.
  2. In the top right corner under the Research pulldown, select Library.
  3. From your 'All Papers' list or a specific folder, tick the checkbox next to the items you want to export.
  4. In the Papers Selected bar, select Export and choose your preferred export method.
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How do I search for and sort papers in my Library?

Above the list of papers saved in your Library, you will find a search bar along with sorting options to help you narrow down and sort your list of saved papers.

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Will papers stay in my Library, even when I sign out of Semantic Scholar?

Yes. Papers will remain in your Library until you remove them.

Research Dashboard

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What is my Research Dashboard?

When signed in to your account, your Research Dashboard serves as your Semantic Scholar homepage (www.semanticscholar.org) where you can view the latest recommended papers from your Research Feeds and new papers from your alerts.

If you claimed your author page, you can also view the most recent citations for papers on your author page and quick links to your author page and editing options.

Research Feeds

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What are Research Feeds?

Research Feeds are an adaptive research recommender that uses AI to quickly learn what papers you care about reading and recommends the latest research to help you stay up to date. We use a state-of-the-art paper embedding model trained using contrastive learning to find papers similar to those in each Library folder.

You can turn on Research Feed recommendations for any folder in your Library. The papers you save within your Library folders are positive signals, and the more papers you save to a Library folder and rate as “not relevant” in your Research Feed, the better your recommended papers will be.

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How do I create a Research Feed?

We recently simplified creating and curating Research Feeds by basing them on the folders in your Library.

When you find a paper you're interested in, select the Save to Library option on the paper page or select Save in the list of actions below the paper title. You can then turn on a Research Feed from your Library folder and from your Research Feeds page.

  • On your Library page, select a folder in the left panel. In the main column above the Sort options, toggle the Research Feed on or off.
  • On your Research Feeds page, select Settings above the right Viewing panel to view a list of all of your folders. Toggle the Rearch Feed on or off.

When you create a new Research Feed, come back tomorrow to view your recommendations. Recommendations are refreshed daily on your Research Dashboard and your Research Feeds page. You will also receive email alerts with new recommendations. To manage your email alerts, see "How do I manage the email alerts for my Research Feeds?".

Tip: The papers you save within a Library folder are positive signals, and the more papers you save to a Library folder and rate as "not relevant" in your Research Feed, the better your recommended papers will be. To ensure you receive the best recommendations, try rating 5 relevant papers by adding them to a Library folder, and 3 non-relevant papers by marking them as "not relevant" in the corresponding Research Feed.

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How do I view my saved Research Feeds?

When signed in to your account, you can navigate to your feeds on the Research Feeds page or from a folder in your Library. You'll see today's recommendations as well as past recommendations.

If you have multiple Research Feeds, you can view up to 10 feeds on your Research Feeds page. From the top right corner under Research, select Research Feeds. In the "Viewing" panel, toggle on which feeds you want to view. For a list of all of your viewing options, select Settings above the "Viewing" panel.

You can also navigate to a single Research Feed through your Library. Select the folder from your Library and then select Research Feed in the main column above the Sort options.

Note: Your Research Dashboard displays your new recommendations, but does not display past recommendations.

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How are papers in my Research Feed recommended?

Semantic Scholar uses a state-of-the-art paper embedding model trained using contrastive learning to find papers similar to those in each Library folder.

The papers you save within a Library folder are positive signals, and the more papers you save to a Library folder and rate as “not relevant” in your Research Feed, the better your recommended papers will be.

With these signals, our model is able to fine-tune your paper recommendations and suggest more relevant research over time.

Tip: To ensure you receive the best recommendations, try rating 5 relevant papers by adding them to a Library folder, and 3 non-relevant papers by marking them as "not relevant" in the corresponding Research Feed.

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What papers in my Research Feed are being recommended?

All paper recommendations in a Research Feed are from Semantic Scholar's corpus published in the last 3 months.

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How do I get the best recommendations in my Research Feed?

Our AI model learns from you. Ratings are essential to teach the model what is or isn't relevant to you.

The papers you save within a Library folder are positive signals, and the more papers you save to a Library folder and rate as "not relevant" in your Research Feed, the better your recommended papers will be.

To ensure you receive the best recommendations, try rating 5 relevant papers by adding them to a Library folder, and 3 non-relevant papers by marking them as "not relevant" in the corresponding Research Feed.

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What happens when I rate papers in my Research Feed?

Adding papers to a Library folder and indicating that a paper isn't relevant by selecting “not relevant” in the corresponding Research Feed provides a signal to our AI model.

Your Research Feed will take these signals into account each time your feed is refreshed.

Tip: To ensure you receive the best recommendations, try rating 5 relevant papers by adding them to a Library folder, and 3 non-relevant papers by marking them as "not relevant" in the corresponding Research Feed.

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How often are Research Feed recommendations refreshed?

Your Research Feed is refreshed daily. Check back for new paper recommendations each day to see what's new.

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How do I add new papers as seeds to my existing Research Feed?

Adding a paper to a Library folder will update the corresponding Research Feed.

Any paper from the Semantic Scholar corpus can be added to a Library folder as long as it is discoverable on www.semanticscholar.org.

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How can I edit the name or turn off a Research Feed?

The name of a Research Feed is based on its corresponding Library folder. You can edit the name of a Library folder in the settings panel on a folder page of your Library. With the folder selected, select the pencil icon in the navigation sidebar.

You can turn any feed on or off with the toggle on a Library folder page, or within the settings section of the Research Feeds page.

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How do I manage the email alerts for my Research Feeds?

To manage your email preferences to receive or pause Research Feed paper recommendations in your inbox, navigate to your Alert Preferences from your Account Settings.

  1. When signed in to your account, select Account in the top right of the page, and then select Settings.
  2. From the left panel, select Alert Preferences and scroll to Folder Alerts On New Papers to toggle on or off a new paper email alert.

Note: If you toggle on/off a Research Feed in your Library folder, this will also enable/disable the email alert.

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How are documents ranked?

Semantic Scholar uses a relevance function for ranking documents that takes into account different aspects of the query and the paper details to provide the most relevant results.

You can sort your search results by relevance, citation count, most influential papers, and recency using the dropdown menu in the upper-right on the search results page.

The complete Semantic Scholar search reranker model is available at https://github.com/allenai/s2search. You can also read "Building a Better Search Engine for Semantic Scholar" on the AI2 blog.

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Does Semantic Scholar support Boolean search terms and wildcards?

Semantic Scholar search does not support boolean operators or wildcards. Quoted text is supported.

To learn about search filters, view our video tutorials page.

For information on how search results are ranked, see Building a Better Search Engine for Semantic Scholar.

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Do search terms and names need to be capitalized?

No. Our search engine is not case sensitive.

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Does Semantic Scholar recognize abbreviations and acronyms? (i.e., KDD versus knowledge discovery and data mining)

We do some query expansion for author names, but otherwise we do not expand abbreviations and acronyms. For accurate results, please search by full keywords.

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How do you extract topics from papers?

We use machine language techniques to analyze publications and extract topic keywords that balance diversity, relevance, and coverage relative to our corpus.

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Is there a publicly accessible API with a search endpoint?

Yes, view information about the Semantic Scholar Academic Graph (S2AG) API search endpoint at https://www.semanticscholar.org/product/api.

You can also download a subset of the corpus as a single artifact at http://api.semanticscholar.org/corpus/.

We're continuously improving programmatic access to Semantic Scholar's data. If you'd like to stay up-to-date on new features, please subscribe to our Developer Updates in your account subscriptions at https://www.semanticscholar.org/me/account/email.

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Can I search Semantic Scholar with a browser extension?

Yes, Semantic Scholar's Chrome and Firefox browser extensions provide search and one-click navigation to a paper on semanticscholar.org. Get the extension from the Chrome Web Store and Firefox Browser Add-ons.

From any web page, simply highlight any text such as a paper title, keyword, or author name. Then select the Semantic Scholar browser extension and the Search button to see search results. For paper title matches you can also choose to view the paper page.

Tip: Some search engines such as Duck Duck Go feature search shortcuts to more quickly conduct searches on the Semantic Scholar site.

Semantic Reader

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What is Semantic Reader?

Semantic Reader (beta) is an AI-augmented reader with the potential to revolutionize scientific reading by making it more accessible and richly contextual. Semantic Reader shows citation information in-context, saving you from losing your place in the PDF. We are working on adding new features all the time. Learn more

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What papers are available to read in Semantic Reader?

The Semantic Reader is currently only available for papers that are published on ArXiv. We currently have 250k+ (and counting!) ArXiv papers available with Semantic Reader. We’re very excited to expand our paper processing capabilities to cover papers from other sources.

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Who can see my annotations on Semantic Reader?

See Hypothes.is documentation for an explanation of visibility in the default “Public” group. More detailed documentation on Hypothes.is groups can be found here.

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Do I have to create an account with Hypothes.is to create an annotation in Semantic Reader?

The answer is “yes” at this time. However, for our next release we plan to set up authentication via your Semantic Scholar account, which means a separate Hypothes.is account will not be needed.

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