Capsaicin

Known as: 6-Nonenamide, N-((4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methyl)-8-methyl-, (E)-, (E)-N-[(4-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-8-methyl-6-nonenamide, 8 Methyl N Vanillyl 6 Nonenamide 
A chili pepper extract with analgesic properties. Capsaicin is a neuropeptide releasing agent selective for primary sensory peripheral neurons. Used… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2011
Review
2011
Topical capsaicin formulations are used for pain management. Safety and modest efficacy of low-concentration capsaicin… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Mammals detect temperature with specialized neurons in the peripheral nervous system. Four TRPV-class channels have been… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The vanilloid receptor VR1 is a nonselective cation channel that is most abundant in peripheral sensory fibers but also is found… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Tissue injury generates endogenous factors that heighten our sense of pain by increasing the response of sensory nerve endings to… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
The capsaicin (vanilloid) receptor VR1 is a cation channel expressed by primary sensory neurons of the "pain" pathway… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Capsaicin, a pungent ingredient of hot peppers, causes excitation of small sensory neurons, and thereby produces severe pain. A… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
The capsaicin (vanilloid) receptor, VR1, is a sensory neuron-specific ion channel that serves as a polymodal detector of pain… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Capsaicin applied topically to human skin produces itching, pricking and burning sensations due to excitation of nociceptors… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Capsaicin, the main pungent ingredient in "hot" chili peppers, elicits buming pain by activating specific (vanilloid) receptors… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Capsaicin, the main pungent ingredient in ‘hot’ chilli peppers, elicits a sensation of burning pain by selectively activating… (More)
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