otilonium bromide

Known as: N-diethylmethylammoniummethyl-p-(2-(N-octyloxy)benzoyl)aminobenzoate bromide, octylonium bromide 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1980-2016
024619802016

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2011
2011
BACKGROUND/AIMS Antispasmodics including otilonium bromide (OB) are recommended to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). However… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • table 3
  • table 4
  • table 5
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
Antispasmodics are used clinically to treat a variety of gastrointestinal disorders by inhibition of smooth muscle contraction… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • table 1
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
To evaluate therapies available for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome, and provide consensus recommendations for their… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • figure 2
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2004
2004
Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca… (More)
Is this relevant?
2004
2004
The aim of this study is to evaluate in vitro the effect of otilonium bromide (OB) on the mechanical and electrical activities of… (More)
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
1. Otilonium bromide (OB) is a smooth muscle relaxant used in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Otilonium bromide has… (More)
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE In order to follow the most recent developments and recommendations in trial methodology for drug evaluation… (More)
Is this relevant?
1998
1998
The interaction of Otilonium bromide (OB) with binding sites for 63 different receptors and ion channels in appropriate… (More)
Is this relevant?
1998
1998
AIM To evaluate the efficacy of otilonium bromide, a spasmolytic agent, in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome using modern… (More)
Is this relevant?
1991
1991
Seventy-two patients complaining of abdominal pain were studied in a double blind trial with otilonium bromide (OB) (40 mg tid or… (More)
Is this relevant?