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Phytosterols

Known as: Plant Sterol, Steroids, Plant, Phytoteroid 
A plant-based compound that can compete with dietary cholesterol to be absorbed by the intestines, resulting in lower blood cholesterol levels… 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2009
Review
2009
Phytosterol and stanol (or phytosterols) consumption reduces intestinal cholesterol absorption, leading to decreased blood LDL… 
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
We present an improved and extended version of our coarse grained lipid model. The new version, coined the MARTINI force field… 
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Review
2002
Review
2002
Phytosterols (plant sterols) are triterpenes that are important structural components of plant membranes, and free phytosterols… 
Review
2002
Review
2002
  • R. Ostlund
  • Annual review of nutrition
  • 2002
  • Corpus ID: 20413339
Phytosterols are cholesterol-like molecules found in all plant foods, with the highest concentrations occurring in vegetable oils… 
Review
2000
Review
2000
Phytosterols (PS) or plant sterols are structurally similar to cholesterol. The most common PS are beta-sitosterol, campesterol… 
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
In healthy individuals, acute changes in cholesterol intake produce modest changes in plasma cholesterol levels. A striking… 
Review
1999
Review
1999
  • W. Craig
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 1999
  • Corpus ID: 13676152
Herbs have been used as food and for medicinal purposes for centuries. Research interest has focused on various herbs that… 
Review
1995
Review
1995
Most animal and human studies show that phytosterols reduce serum/or plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL… 
Review
1976
Review
1976