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Oncogenes

Known as: Oncogene, Cancer-Promoting Gene, Genes, Transforming 
Genes whose gain-of-function alterations lead to NEOPLASTIC CELL TRANSFORMATION. They include, for example, genes for activators or stimulators of… 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2006
Review
2006
MicroRNA (miRNA) alterations are involved in the initiation and progression of human cancer. The causes of the widespread… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Recent work has revealed the existence of a class of small non-coding RNA species, known as microRNAs (miRNAs), which have… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
To date, more than 200 microRNAs have been described in humans; however, the precise functions of these regulatory, non-coding… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The struggle to combat cancer — including the discovery of oncogenes, tumor suppressors, telomerase, and cancer stem cells — has… 
Review
1990
Review
1989
Review
1989
  • J. Bos
  • Cancer research
  • 1989
  • Corpus ID: 29749617
Mutations in codon 12, 13, or 61 of one of the three ras genes, H-ras, K-ras, and N-ras, convert these genes into active… 
Highly Cited
1989
Highly Cited
1989
Carcinoma of the breast and ovary account for one-third of all cancers occurring in women and together are responsible for… 
Highly Cited
1987
Highly Cited
1987
The HER-2/neu oncogene is a member of the erbB-like oncogene family, and is related to, but distinct from, the epidermal growth… 
Highly Cited
1983
Highly Cited
1983
Transfection of embryo fibroblasts by a human ras oncogene does not convert them into tumour cells unless the fibroblasts are…