PAWR gene

Known as: PROSTATE APOPTOSIS RESPONSE PROTEIN 4, TRANSCRIPTIONAL REPRESSOR PAR4, PRKC, Apoptosis, WT1, Regulator Gene 
This gene plays a role in repression of transcription. It is also involved in regulation of apoptosis.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1997-2017
0519972017

Papers overview

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2015
2015
An active medicinal component of plant origin with an ability to overcome autophagy by inducing apoptosis should be considered a… (More)
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2013
2013
RNA activation is a promising discovery that promoter-targeted double-stranded small RNAs, termed small activating RNAs (saRNAs… (More)
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2011
2011
Depression is a common mental disorder; however, its molecular mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we… (More)
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2009
2009
Ghrelin is known to promote neuronal defense and survival against ischemic injury by inhibiting apoptotic processes. In the… (More)
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2008
2008
Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) have been implicated in the development of bone metastases in prostate cancer. In this study… (More)
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2008
2008
Abnormal dopamine signal transduction is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. A recent study showed that prostate… (More)
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2006
2006
Multiple lines of evidence demonstrated that increased brain oxidative stress is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD… (More)
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2002
2002
BACKGROUND Hypertension is a risk factor for coronary heart disease. Macrophages are critically involved in both atherogenesis… (More)
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1999
1999
Dysfunction and death of midbrain dopaminergic neurons underlies the clinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Increasing… (More)
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