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Autophagy

Known as: Macroautophagy, autophagy/autophagia, Autophagies, Cellular 
A normal process in which a cell destroys proteins and other substances in its cytoplasm (the fluid inside the cell membrane but outside the nucleus… 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2014
Review
2014
SIGNIFICANCE The molecular machinery regulating autophagy has started becoming elucidated, and a number of studies have… 
Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
The protumor functions for autophagy are largely attributed to its ability to promote cancer cell survival in response to stress… 
Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
In response to stress, cells start transcriptional and transcription‐independent programs that can lead to adaptation or death… 
Review
2009
Review
2009
Autophagy or “self-eating” is a highly conserved pathway that enables cells to degrade pieces of themselves in autolysosomes to… 
Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Aims/hypothesisBeta cell loss contributes to type 2 diabetes, with increased apoptosis representing an underlying mechanism… 
Review
2006
Review
2006
Bcl-2 was the first identified cellular protein that functions as an oncogene by blocking apoptotic cell death. Beclin 1, the… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Autophagy is a transport system of cytoplasmic components to the lysosome/vacuole for degradation well conserved in eukaryotes… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
After ingestion by macrophages, Legionella pneumophila enter spacious vacuoles that are quickly enveloped by endoplasmic… 
Review
2004
Review
2004
Intracellular bacteria and viruses must survive the vigorous antimicrobial responses of their hosts to replicate successfully… 
Review
2001
Review
2001
Recent analyses of the genes required for autophagy ? intracellular bulk protein degradation ? in yeast have revealed two…