ATG5 gene

Known as: ATG5, AUTOPHAGY 5, S. CEREVISIAE, HOMOLOG OF, hAPG5 
This gene plays a role in autophagy and may play a role in apoptosis.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1982-2017
05010015019822017

Papers overview

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2013
2013
Autophagy is a conserved homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic contents are degraded and recycled. Two ubiquitin-like… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Autophagy is a cellular degradation process that can capture and eliminate intracellular microbes by delivering them to lysosomes… (More)
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2012
Highly Cited
2012
We have previously shown that elevated expression of mitotic kinase aurora kinase A (AURKA) in cancer cells promotes the… (More)
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2011
Highly Cited
2011
OBJECTIVE Recent genome-wide association studies suggested the PRDM1-ATG5 gene region as a systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE… (More)
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2010
Highly Cited
2010
Tumor hypoxia is a common microenvironmental factor that adversely influences tumor phenotype and treatment response. Cellular… (More)
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2010
Highly Cited
2010
Autophagy functions as an important catabolic mechanism by mediating the turnover of intracellular organelles and protein… (More)
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2009
Highly Cited
2009
Mounting evidence indicates that alterations of autophagy processes are directly involved in the development of many human… (More)
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2008
Highly Cited
2008
Macroautophagy (herein autophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved process, requiring the gene ATG5, by which cells degrade… (More)
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2007
Highly Cited
2007
Phagocytosis and autophagy are two ancient, highly conserved processes involved, respectively, in the removal of extracellular… (More)
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2007
2007
Macroautophagy (herein autophagy) is a cellular process, requiring ATG5, by which cells deliver double membrane-bound packets… (More)
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