PRM1 gene

Known as: PRM1, SPERM PROTAMINE P1, cancer/testis antigen family 94, member 1 
 

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1987-2017
024619872017

Papers overview

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2015
2015
During fertilization, spermatozoa make essential contributions to embryo development by providing oocyte activating factors… (More)
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2012
2012
Protamine genes play important roles in DNA packaging within the sperm nucleus. In order to evaluate the association of PRM1… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Cytokinesis is incomplete in spermatogenic cells, and the descendants of each stem cell form a clonal syncytium. As a result, a… (More)
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2003
2003
Protamine molecules bind to and condense DNA in the sperm of most vertebrates, packaging the sperm genome in an inactive state… (More)
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2002
2002
We have compared the relative proportion of protamine 1 (P1) and protamine 2 (P2) bound to DNA in the sperm of a variety of… (More)
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1997
1997
A novel method for reconstituting sperm chromatin was used to investigate how protamine 1 condenses DNA. Complexes formed in… (More)
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1996
1996
The total amount of phosphorus and sulfur inside the nuclei of individual bull, stallion, hamster, human, and mouse sperm from… (More)
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1993
1993
Protamines are small arginine-rich proteins that package DNA in spermatozoa. The mouse protamine 1 (Prm-1) gene is transcribed… (More)
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1990
1990
Temporal translational control is an important mechanism of gene regulation during mouse spermatogenesis. Studies of the… (More)
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1987
1987
Protamines are abundant basic proteins involved in the condensation of sperm chromatin. In the mouse, protamine genes are… (More)
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