Muscular Atrophy

Known as: Muscle Atrophies, ATROPHY MUSCLE, Muscle Atrophy 
A process, occurring in the muscle, that is characterized by a decrease in protein content, fiber diameter, force production and fatigue resistance… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2017
Review
2017
Cancer cachexia characterized by a chronic wasting syndrome, involves skeletal muscle loss and adipose tissue loss and resistance… (More)
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Review
2016
Review
2016
Skeletal muscles comprise the largest organ system in the body and play an essential role in body movement, breathing, and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Maintaining muscle size and fiber composition requires contractile activity. Increased activity stimulates expression of the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Skeletal muscle atrophy is a debilitating response to fasting, disuse, cancer, and other systemic diseases. In atrophying muscles… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Skeletal muscle size depends upon a dynamic balance between anabolic (or hypertrophic) and catabolic (or atrophic) processes… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Skeletal muscle atrophy is a debilitating response to starvation and many systemic diseases including diabetes, cancer, and renal… (More)
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Review
2002
Review
2002
The muscular dystrophies are inherited myogenic disorders characterised by progressive muscle wasting and weakness of variable… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Skeletal muscle adapts to decreases in activity and load by undergoing atrophy. To identify candidate molecular mediators of… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Skeletal muscles adapt to changes in their workload by regulating fibre size by unknown mechanisms. The roles of two signalling… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Muscle wasting is a debilitating consequence of fasting, inactivity, cancer, and other systemic diseases that results primarily… (More)
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