Low-Dose Aspirin

Known as: Baby Aspirin 
Aspirin containing a lower dose than a standard adult tablet, usually between 81 and 100mg.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2012
Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
BACKGROUND Clopidogrel and aspirin are the most commonly used antiplatelet therapies for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
BACKGROUND It is uncertain whether aspirin therapy should be continued after endoscopic hemostatic therapy in patients who… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
BACKGROUND The role of gastric acid suppression in preventing the recurrence of ulcer complications after the eradication of… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
BACKGROUND Many patients who have had upper gastrointestinal bleeding continue to take low-dose aspirin for cardiovascular… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
BACKGROUND In addition to the treatment of specific cardiovascular risk factors, intervention which interferes with the general… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
UNLABELLED BACKGROUND The relation between medications that release nitric oxide, such as nitroglycerin and other… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
OBJECTIVE:Aspirin products are known to cause irritation and injury to the gastric mucosa. We examined the risk of… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • table 3
  • table 4
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to compare the use of low-dose aspirin alone with heparin and low-dose aspirin in the… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1982
Highly Cited
1982
Acetylation of platelet cyclooxygenase by oral aspirin is dose dependent and cumulative with repeated administration. However, no… (More)
  • table I
  • figure 1
  • table II
  • figure 3
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?