Halobacterium salinarium

Known as: Flavobacterium (subgen. Halobacterium) halobium, Halobacter salinaria, Serratia salinaria 
A species of halophilic archaea found in salt lakes. Some strains form a PURPLE MEMBRANE under anaerobic conditions.
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Fermentative growth via the arginine deiminase pathway is mediated by the enzymes arginine deiminase, carbamate kinase, and… (More)
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1996
1996
Halobacterium salinarium is a chemo- and phototactic archaeon whose signal transduction pathway includes the classical two… (More)
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1996
1996
Gas vesicle (Vac) synthesis in Halobacterium salinarium PHH1 involves the expression of the plasmid pHH1-encoded vac (p-vac… (More)
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1995
1995
The light-driven chloride pump, halorhodopsin, is a mixture containing all-trans and 13-cis retinal chromophores under both light… (More)
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Highly Cited
1976
Highly Cited
1976
The glycoprotein which accounts for approximately 50% of the protein and all of the nonlipid carbohydrate of the cell envelope of… (More)
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1976
1976
The obligate halophile, Halobacterium salinarium, maintains a rod-shaped morphology under normal growth conditions… (More)
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Highly Cited
1975
Highly Cited
1975
A halophilic bacterium was isolated from bottom sediment from the Dead Sea. The organism possessed the properties of the… (More)
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1974
1974
Halobacterium salinarium is a member of the Halobacteria, a group of obligate, extremely halophilic organisms requiring at least… (More)
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1974
1974
The isolated cell envelope of Halobacterium salinarium strain 1 contained 15 to 20 proteins that were resolved by polyacrylamide… (More)
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Highly Cited
1971