Fast Blue

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1982-2018
05101519822018

Papers overview

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2002
2002
The usefulness of three retrograde fluorescent dyes for tracing injured peripheral axons was investigated. The rat sciatic was… (More)
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2002
2002
Many fluorescent retrograde tracers are commercially available for neuroanatomical studies. They have been used with varying… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
The dentate gyrus continues to produce granule neurons throughout adulthood. The present study examined the extension of axons by… (More)
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1993
1993
The fluorescent retrograde tracers Rhodamine B Isothiocyanate (RITC) and Fast Blue (FB) were injected either into the thalamic… (More)
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Highly Cited
1989
Highly Cited
1989
In adult rats, cortical neurons that extend an exon through the pyramidal tract (a major subcortical efferent projection of the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
To study the retrograde labeling of intact and axotomized retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) over long periods of time, we applied the… (More)
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1987
1987
Some basic methodological issues concerning the use of the fluorescent tracers Fast blue (FB) and Diamidino yellow (DY) were… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
Highly Cited
1986
Mature male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study to compare the organization of the pudendal nerve in the two… (More)
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Highly Cited
1984
Highly Cited
1984
Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) histochemistry and double labeling with the fluorescent dyes nuclear yellow (NY) and fast blue (FB… (More)
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Highly Cited
1983
Highly Cited
1983
Earlier studies showed that Nuclear Yellow (NY), True Blue (TB) and Fast Blue (FB) are transported retrogradely through axons to… (More)
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