Dysidea

Known as: Dysideas 
A genus of SPONGES in the family Dysideidae, in which all skeletal fibers are filled with detritus.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1977-2018
051019772018

Papers overview

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2008
2008
Five new sesquiterpenes, named lingshuiolides A (1) and B (2), lingshuiperoxide (6), isodysetherin (10), and spirolingshuiolide… (More)
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2008
2008
The new chlorinated peptides sintokamides A to E (1-5) have been isolated from specimens of the marine sponge Dysidea sp… (More)
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2006
2006
Numerous opisthobranchs are known to sequester chemical defenses from their prey and use them for their own defense. Information… (More)
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2005
2005
The inhibition of superoxide production by human neutrophils has been used to screen New Zealand's unique biota for anti… (More)
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2005
2005
OBJECTIVES Assessment of antifungal activity of a compound isolated from the marine sponge Dysidea herbacea against the fungal… (More)
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2000
2000
Among all metazoan phyla, sponges are known to produce the largest number of bioactive compounds. However, until now, only one… (More)
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1999
1999
Bioassay-guided fractionation of an extract from a marine sponge, Dysidea herbacea, led to the isolation and identification of… (More)
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1998
1998
The tropical marine sponge Dysidea herbacea (Keller) contains the filamentous unicellular cyanobacterium Oscillatoria spongeliae… (More)
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1997
1997
The marine sponge Dysidea herbacea collected from Indonesia yielded four new polybrominated diphenyl ether congeners 2-5 and the… (More)
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1995
1995
Extracts and pure compounds isolated from four samples of Dysidea sp. sponges collected from two geographically distinct regions… (More)
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