open-field behavior

Known as: open field behavior 
 
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
In order to better understand the behavioral adaptations induced by physical activity, this set of experiments assessed the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Previous work has shown that systematic individual differences between male Wistar rats can be detected in tasks like the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The open field test (OFT) is a widely used procedure for examining the behavioral effects of drugs and anxiety. Detailed… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
We previously showed the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen suppresses inflammation and amyloid in the APPsw… (More)
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2001
2001
A previous report showed that the open field behavior of rats sensitized to the dopamine agonist quinpirole satisfies 5… (More)
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1998
1998
The study examined the possibility that propranolol, buspirone, pCPA, and reserpine have antianxiety effects by comparing their… (More)
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1998
1998
Since the introduction of Cyclosporine A (CsA) for immunosuppression in solid-organ transplantation, the rate of allograft… (More)
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1986
1986
The open field test (OFT) was carried out on Wistar and Sprague-Dawley rats between the ages of 3 to 20 weeks. At that time, the… (More)
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1985
1985
Rats were tested in an open field after previous exposure to a weak, 50-Hz electromagnetic field of the same order of magnitude… (More)
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1985
1985
Rhesus monkey infants were marginally deprived of zinc (4 ppm diet) from conception and were compared to controls (100 ppm diet… (More)
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