idarucizumab

Known as: aDabi-Fab 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2014-2018
010203020142018

Papers overview

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2017
2017
BACKGROUND Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment, was developed to reverse the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran… (More)
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2016
2016
CONTEXT An overdose of oral anticoagulants represents a challenging scenario for emergency physicians. Dabigatran, an oral direct… (More)
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2016
2016
We describe a 75-year-old female patient with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation who presented with acute ischemic stroke during… (More)
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2016
2016
We here describe our experience of systemic thrombolysis therapy for severe ischemic stroke in a patient taking dabigatran for… (More)
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2016
2016
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Non-vitamin K anticoagulants (NOAC) such as dabigatran have become important therapeutic options for the… (More)
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2016
2016
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Therapeutic options for acute ischemic stroke patients presenting on effective anticoagulation are limited… (More)
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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
BACKGROUND Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody fragment that binds dabigatran with high affinity in a 1:1 molar ratio. We… (More)
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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
Idarucizumab, a monoclonal antibody fragment that binds dabigatran with high affinity, is in development as a specific antidote… (More)
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2015
2015
Urgent surgery or life-threatening bleeding requires prompt reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran. This study… (More)
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2015
2015
Lack of specific antidotes is a major concern in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) related to direct anticoagulants including… (More)
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