Restless Legs Syndrome

Known as: Syndrome, Restless Leg, Wittmaack-Ekbom Syndrome, Willis-Ekbom Disease 
A condition in which a person has a strong urge to move his or her legs in order to stop uncomfortable sensations. These include burning, itching… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2006
Review
2006
Restless legs syndrome (RLS) involves abnormal limb sensations that diminish with motor activity, worsen at rest, have a… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
BACKGROUND There is a need for an easily administered instrument which can be applied to all patients with restless legs syndrome… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
OBJECTIVE To assess neuropathology in individuals with restless legs syndrome (RLS). METHODS A standard neuropathologic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
BACKGROUND Periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are two sleep disorders characterized by… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The term restless legs syndrome (RLS) was first introduced by Karl A Ekbom, a Swedish neurologist and surgeon, in 1945, although… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
One hundred thirty-three cases of restless legs syndrome (RLS), diagnosed with criteria recently formulated by an international… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Despite recent attempts to better characterize restless legs syndrome (RLS), this neurologic disorder remains poorly understood… (More)
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
The relationship between iron status and the restless legs syndrome (RLS) was examined in 18 elderly patients with RLS and in 18… (More)
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Highly Cited
1960
Highly Cited
1960
The term restless legs syndrome (RLS) was first introduced by Karl A Ekbom, a Swedish neurologist and surgeon, in 1945, although… (More)
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