PYY3 gene

Known as: OTTHUMG00000021515, PYY3, peptide YY, 3 (pseudogene) 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1992-2018
051019922018

Papers overview

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2014
2014
The landmark discovery by Bayliss and Starling in 1902 of the first hormone, secretin, emerged from earlier observations that a… (More)
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2014
2014
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGBP) reduces appetite and induces significant and sustainable weight loss. Circulating… (More)
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Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
OBJECTIVE We aimed to determine changes in crypt cell proliferation and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) in rodents and man after… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Peptide YY (PYY)(3-36) has been shown to produce dramatic reductions in energy intake (EI), but no human data exist regarding… (More)
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2007
2007
Intraveneous (i.v.) PYY(3-36) infusions have been reported to reduce energy intake (EI) in humans, whereas few studies exist on… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
BACKGROUND & AIMS Studies in animals and humans suggest a role for peptide YY (PYY3-36) in regulating satiety. The physiologic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Peptide YY (PYY) is a postprandially released gut hormone. Peripheral administration of one form of the peptide PYY3-36 produces… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
It has recently been suggested that gut-derived PYY(3-36) may be involved in the central mediation of post-prandial satiety… (More)
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2003
2003
Peptide YY3-36 (PYY) has emerged as an important signal in the gut-brain axis, with peripherally administered PYY affecting… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Food intake is regulated by the hypothalamus, including the melanocortin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) systems in the arcuate nucleus… (More)
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