MSH6 gene

Known as: mutS homolog 6, G/T MISMATCH-BINDING PROTEIN, MutS, E. COLI, HOMOLOG OF, 6 
This gene is involved in mismatch repair and plays a role in several cancers.

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Topic mentions per year

1954-2017
010203019542016

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
BACKGROUND & AIMS We developed and validated a model to estimate the risks of mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
PURPOSE Glioblastomas are treated by surgical resection followed by radiotherapy [X-ray therapy (XRT)] and the alkylating… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Malignant gliomas have a very poor prognosis. The current standard of care for these cancers consists of extended adjuvant… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
The MSH6 gene is one of the mismatch-repair genes involved in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Three hundred… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is the most common genetic susceptibility syndrome for colorectal cancer… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Cancer predisposition in hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) is caused by defects in DNA mismatch repair (MMR… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes six genes, MSH1-6, which encode proteins related to the bacterial MutS protein. In this study… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
In human cells, mismatch recognition is mediated by a heterodimeric complex, hMutSalpha, comprised of two members of the MutS… (More)
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
The molecular defects responsible for tumor cell hypermutability in humans have not yet been fully identified. Here the gene… (More)
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