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Kynurenic Acid

Known as: 2-Quinolinecarboxylic acid, 4-hydroxy-, Acid, Kynurenic, Kynurenic Acid [Chemical/Ingredient] 
A broad-spectrum excitatory amino acid antagonist used as a research tool.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2019
Review
2019
  • B. Pedersen
  • Nature Reviews Endocrinology
  • 2019
  • Corpus ID: 71143821
Neurological and mental illnesses account for a considerable proportion of the global burden of disease. Exercise has many… Expand
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
BACKGROUND The kynurenic acid (KYNA) hypothesis for schizophrenia is partly based on studies showing increased brain levels of… Expand
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Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
Inflammatory signaling plays a key role in tumor progression, and the pleiotropic cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important… Expand
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a tryptophan metabolite that is synthesized and released by astrocytes and acts as a competitive… Expand
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Local catabolism of the essential amino acid tryptophan is considered an important mechanism in regulating immunological and… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) has long been recognized as an NMDA receptor antagonist. Here, interactions… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Kynurenic acid is an endogenous glutamate antagonist with a preferential action at the glycine-site of the N-methyl D-aspartate… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA) has long been recognized as an NMDA receptor antagonist. Here, interactions… Expand
Is this relevant?
Review
1993
Review
1993
In a little more than 10 years, the kynurenine metabolites of tryptophan have emerged from their former position as biochemical… Expand
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
Excitatory amino acid (EAA)-mediated synaptic transmission is the most prevalent excitatory system within the mammalian brain… Expand
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