Keratins, Type II

Known as: Keratin, Type II, Keratins, Type 2, Type II Intermediate Filament Proteins 
A keratin subtype that includes keratins that are generally larger and less acidic that TYPE I KERATINS. Type II keratins combine with type I… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2006
2006
Epidermal homeostasis is understood as the maintenance of epidermal tissue structure and function by a fine tuned regulatory… (More)
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2005
2005
The recent completion of a reference sequence of the human genome now allows a complete characterization of the type II keratin… (More)
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2004
2004
Besides medical application as composite skin grafts, in vitro constructed skin equivalents (SEs) or organotypic co-cultures… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
In wound healing and many pathologic conditions, keratinocytes become activated: they turn into migratory, hyperproliferative… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The properties of keratin intermediate filaments (IFs) have been studied after transfection with green fluorescent protein (GFP… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Galectin-7 is a 14-kDA member of the lectin family we have previously cloned in the human. Its expression was found at all stages… (More)
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1994
1994
The 55 kDa keratin K12 and the 59 kDa keratin K4 were used as biochemical markers of differentiated corneal and conjunctival… (More)
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1993
1993
Keratin intermediate filaments (IF) are obligate heteropolymers containing equal amounts of type I and type II keratin. We have… (More)
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Highly Cited
1990
Highly Cited
1990
Recombinant DNA technology has been used to analyze the first step in keratin intermediate filament (IF) assembly; i.e., the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
Highly Cited
1986
The four major keratins of normal human epidermis (molecular mass 50, 56.5, 58, and 65-67 kD) can be subdivided on the basis of… (More)
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