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HES2 gene

Known as: HAIRY/ENHANCER OF SPLIT, DROSOPHILA, HOMOLOG OF, 2, bHLHb40, HES2 
This gene is involved in the negative regulation of gene expression.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2015
2015
BACKGROUND Human (h) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) serve as a potential unlimited ex… Expand
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2012
2012
Stem cell derived cardiomyocytes generated either from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-CMs) or human induced pluripotent stem… Expand
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2010
2010
Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) offer new avenues for studying human development and disease progression in addition to their… Expand
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Although both the H1 and HES2 human embryonic stem cell lines (NIH codes: WA01 and ES02, respectively) are capable of forming all… Expand
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2008
2008
Notch signaling is involved in a large range of developmental processes, and has been functionally implicated in body plan… Expand
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2007
2007
Mathematical simulations of oxygen delivery to tissue from capillaries that take into account the particulate nature of blood… Expand
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2004
2004
MMTV induces the mouse mammary tumor through the dysregulation of Notch, Wnt, or Fgf signaling pathway. Activation of Notch… Expand
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2004
2004
Activation of Notch signaling pathway leads to nuclear translocation of Notch intracellular domain (NIC), and transcriptional… Expand
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2002
2002
The jerker mutation causes degeneration of cochlea and vestibular sensory hair cells in mice. A frame-shift mutation in the actin… Expand
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