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Genus: Coronavirus

Known as: Coronavirus, Coronaviruses 
A genus of single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses in the family coronaviridae. The coronavirus genome exhibits helical symmetry.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2018
Review
2018
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) are two… Expand
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Review
2018
Review
2018
Viruses are the most common causes of respiratory infection. The imaging findings of viral pneumonia are diverse and overlap with… Expand
Review
2018
Review
2018
ABSTRACT The multi‐domain non‐structural protein 3 (Nsp3) is the largest protein encoded by the coronavirus (CoV) genome, with an… Expand
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Review
2017
Review
2017
Human coronaviruses (hCoVs) can be divided into low pathogenic and highly pathogenic coronaviruses. The low pathogenic CoVs… Expand
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Review
2017
Review
2017
Human coronaviruses (HCoVs), including SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, are zoonotic pathogens that… Expand
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Review
2017
Review
2017
Emerging viruses such as HIV, dengue, influenza A, SARS coronavirus, Ebola, and other viruses pose a significant threat to human… Expand
Review
2016
Review
2016
  • Fang Li
  • Annual review of virology
  • 2016
  • Corpus ID: 24503659
The coronavirus spike protein is a multifunctional molecular machine that mediates coronavirus entry into host cells. It first… Expand
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Review
2016
Review
2016
The emergence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012 marked the second introduction of a highly… Expand
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Review
2016
Review
2016
In humans, infections with the human coronavirus (HCoV) strains HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-HKU1 usually result in… Expand
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Review
2016
Review
2016
Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) were first described in the 1960s for patients with the common cold. Since then, more HCoVs have… Expand
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