Contraceptive Sponge - device

Known as: Contraceptive Sponge, Contraceptive Sponges, sponge contraceptive 
A sponge impregnated with an antispermicidal agent; it is designed to be placed into the vaginal canal to prevent live sperm from entering the uterus… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1977-2005
0246819772005

Papers overview

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1998
1998
  • Contraceptive technology update
  • 1998
US women are able to import contraceptive agents not available in the US from two Canadian companies who advertise their products… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
OBJECTIVE To determine the efficacy of the nonoxynol 9 contraceptive sponge in preventing sexual acquisition of the human… (More)
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1988
1988
The etiology of toxic shock syndrome (TSS) has been extensively investigated in recent years. It is generally accepted that the… (More)
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1987
1987
Pregnancy rates (method and user) were evaluated for 2245 women who participated in the phase III clinical trials of the Today… (More)
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1986
1986
The results of a randomized United States study indicated that the Today contraceptive sponge was less effective than the… (More)
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1984
1984
The Today vaginal contraceptive sponge is a non-prescription barrier contraceptive which, after rigorous testing, was recently… (More)
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1983
1983
  • Contraceptive technology update
  • 1983
Federal investigators have failed to substantiate a suspected link between the contraceptive sponge and toxic shock syndrome (TSS… (More)
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1982
1982
  • Dana Serfaty
  • Therapeutique. Entretiens de Bichat Pitie…
  • 1982
This article describes the use of the Pharmatex vaginal tampon by 105 women at the Center for Birth Regulation at the Saint-Louis… (More)
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1980
1980
Newly designed intravaginal polyurethane sponges containing the spermicide nonoxynol-9 were developed for contraceptive purposes… (More)
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