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Context-free grammar

Known as: Context-free grammars, CFG, Context Free Grammar 
A context-free grammar (CFG) is a term used in formal language theory to describe a certain type of formal grammar. A context-free grammar is a set… 
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Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2017
Highly Cited
2017
Deep generative models have been wildly successful at learning coherent latent representations for continuous data such as video… 
Review
2010
Review
2010
Given that context-free grammars (CFG) cannot adequately describe natural languages, grammar formalisms beyond CFG that are still… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
This paper addresses the smallest grammar problem: What is the smallest context-free grammar that generates exactly one given… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Most current statistical natural language processing models use only local features so as to permit dynamic programming in… 
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
We describe a parsing system based upon a language model for English that is, in turn, based upon assigning probabilities to… 
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
This chapter is devoted to context-free languages. Context-free languages and grammars were designed initially to formalize… 
Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
  • M. Pentus
  • [] Proceedings Eighth Annual IEEE Symposium on…
  • 1993
  • Corpus ID: 1910507
Basic categorial grammars are the context-free ones. Another kind of categorial grammars was introduced by J. Lambek (1958… 
Highly Cited
1968
Highly Cited
1968
  • A. Aho
  • Journal of the ACM
  • 1968
  • Corpus ID: 9539666
A new type of grammar for generating formal languages, called an indexed grammar, is presented. An indexed grammar is an… 
Highly Cited
1966
Highly Cited
1966
In this report, certain properties of context-free (CF or type 2) grammars are investigated, like that of Chomsky. In particular…