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Carnosine

Known as: L-Carnosine, beta Alanylhistidine, Carnosine [Chemical/Ingredient] 
A dipeptide comprised of a beta-alanine and a 3-methyl-L-histidine, which is found in dietary red meat, with potential antioxidant, metal-chelating… 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2013
Review
2013
Carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine) was discovered in 1900 as an abundant non-protein nitrogen-containing compound of meat. The… 
Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Carnosine (beta-alanyl-l-histidine) is present in high concentrations in human skeletal muscle. The ingestion of beta-alanine… 
Review
2006
Review
2006
Carbonylation of proteins is an irreversible oxidative damage, often leading to a loss of protein function, which is considered a… 
Review
2006
Review
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H(2)O(2) and Cl(-) by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is… 
Review
2005
Review
2005
First isolated and characterized in 1900 by Gulewitsch, carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-hystidine) is a dipeptide commonly present in… 
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The risk of diabetic nephropathy is partially genetically determined. Diabetic nephropathy is linked to a gene locus on… 
Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
We have examined the effects of the naturally occurring dipeptide carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) on the growth, morphology… 
Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
Carnosine, homocarnosine, and anserine are present in high concentrations in the muscle and brain of many animals and humans…