BUB1B gene

Known as: BUB1B, MITOTIC CHECKPOINT GENE BUB1B, BUB1, S. CEREVISIAE, HOMOLOG OF, BETA 
This gene is involved in mitotic progression.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Regulation of BubR1 is central to the control of APC/C activity. We have found that BubR1 forms a complex with PCAF and is… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Faithful segregation of replicated chromosomes is essential for maintenance of genetic stability and seems to be monitored by… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Screening the Saccharomyces cerevisiae disruptome, profiling transcripts, and determining changes in protein expression have… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Genetic evidence is mounting that survivin plays a crucial role in mitosis, but its exact role in human cell division remains… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Ssk1p of Candida albicans is a putative response regulator protein of the Hog1 two-component signal transduction system. In… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The mitotic checkpoint prevents cells with unaligned chromosomes from prematurely exiting mitosis by inhibiting the anaphase… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
Previous studies of the spindle checkpoint suggested that its ability to prevent entry into anaphase was mediated by the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
In a previous study, we reported the isolation and characterization of the two-component response regulator SSK1 gene of Candida… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Exposure of yeast cells to increased extracellular osmolarity induces the HOG1 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
The fission yeast Sty1 MAP kinase is required for cell cycle control, initiation of sexual differentiation, and protection… (More)
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