human granulocytic ehrlichiosis

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1995-2014
05101519952014

Papers overview

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2003
2003
Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) is an emerging tick-borne infectious disease caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Clinical… (More)
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2002
2002
Geographic information systems combined with methods of spatial analysis provide powerful new tools for understanding the… (More)
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2002
2002
We conducted a case-control study in Wisconsin to determine whether some patients have long-term adverse health outcomes after… (More)
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2001
2001
The agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) is an obligate intracellular bacterium with a tropism for neutrophils; however… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Human granulocytotropic ehrlichias are tick-borne bacterial pathogens that cause an acute, life-threatening illness, human… (More)
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1999
1999
To compare clinical features and assess risk factors for human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) and early Lyme disease, we… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE) was recently described in North America. It is caused by an Ehrlichia species closely… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
BACKGROUND Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis is a potentially fatal tick-borne infection that has recently been described. This… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
OBJECTIVE To characterize the clinical and laboratory features observed in patients with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (HGE… (More)
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1996
1996
Human granulocytic ehriichoisis was first described in 1994. This tick-transmitted illness is increasingly recognized in the USA… (More)
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