Teicoplanin

Known as: TEIC, Teichomycin, Teicoplanin [Chemical/Ingredient] 
A glycopeptide antibiotic complex isolated from the bacterium Actinoplanes teichomyceticus. Teicoplanin inhibits peptidoglycan polymerization… (More)
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
BACKGROUND Glycopeptides such as vancomycin are frequently the antibiotics of choice for the treatment of infections caused by… (More)
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2004
2004
The glycopeptide teicoplanin is used for the treatment of serious infections caused by Gram-positive pathogens. The tcp gene… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
A vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) isolate was obtained from a patient in Pennsylvania in September 2002… (More)
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2000
2000
Although modern preparations of vancomycin are associated with a lower incidence of adverse events than the early preparations, a… (More)
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1995
1995
Between February 1992 and February 1993, 12 patients were seen who were infected or colonized with methicillin-resistant strains… (More)
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Review
1990
Review
1990
Vancomycin and teicoplanin are glycopeptides active against a wide range of gram-positive bacteria. For 30 years following the… (More)
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1990
1990
Serial isolates of Staphylococcus aureus showing two- to eightfold increases in teicoplanin minimum inhibitory concentrations… (More)
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Highly Cited
1989
Highly Cited
1989
Enterococcus faecium BM4165 and BM4178, isolated from immunocompromised patients, one treated with vancomycin, were inducibly… (More)
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Highly Cited
1988
1984
1984
Teicoplanin, a new glycopeptide antibiotic belonging to the same family as vancomycin, inhibits cell wall synthesis in Bacillus… (More)
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