Sponge Dosage Form

Known as: SPONGE, Sponge Dose Form 
A solid composed of a porous, interlacing, absorbent, usually shape retaining material, such as cellulose wood fibers or plastic polymer form.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Large-scale mortality of marine invertebrates is a major global concern for ocean ecosystems and many sessile, reef-building… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Marine sponges contain complex assemblages of bacterial symbionts, the roles of which remain largely unknown. We identified… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Well-supported molecular phylogenies, combined with knowledge of modern biology, can lead to new inferences about the sequence of… (More)
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2007
2007
In response to mechanical stimuli the freshwater sponge Ephydatia muelleri (Demospongiae, Haplosclerida, Spongillidae) carries… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Phylogenetic analysis of the ketosynthase (KS) gene sequences of marine sponge-derived Salinispora strains of actinobacteria… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Earth's biota produces vast quantities of polymerized silica at ambient temperatures and pressures by mechanisms that are not… (More)
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1998
1998
Earth’s biota produces vast quantities of polymerized silica at ambient temperatures and pressures by mechanisms that are not… (More)
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1995
1995
The filtration rate (F, m1 min-' measured as clearance of algal cells) and maintenance respiration rate (R,, m1 O2 h-' measured… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
Many coral-reef seaweeds and sessile invertebrates produce both secondary chemicals and mineral or fibrous skeletal materials… (More)
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