Skip to search formSkip to main content

Spinocerebellar Ataxia 12

Known as: SCA12 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2011
Review
2011
SCA12 is a late-onset, autosomal dominant, slowly progressive disorder. Action tremor is the usual presenting sign. Subsequent… Expand
Is this relevant?
2011
2011
OBJECTIVE To undertake an updated genetic spectrum analysis in patients with hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) in mainland… Expand
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
SCA12 is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia characterized by onset in the fourth decade of life with action tremor of arms… Expand
  • table 1
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • table 1
  • table 2
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
The neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia 12 (SCA12) is caused by CAG repeat expansion in the non-coding region of… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2005
2005
The hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders… Expand
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
BACKGROUND Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias are a clinical and genetically heterogeneous group of progressive… Expand
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • table 3
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
Expansions of trinucleotide repeats have been discovered in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) types 1, 2, 6, 7, 12, and 17, Machado… Expand
Is this relevant?
2001
2001
Spinocerebellar ataxia 12 (SCA12) is a recently identified form of autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia associated with the… Expand
Is this relevant?
2001
2001
Spinocerebellar ataxia 12 (SCA12) is an autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA) described in a single family with a CAG… Expand
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
The genetic aetiologies of at least 20% of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have yet to be elucidated. We have… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?