Shellsort

Known as: Shell Sort, Shell, Shell's method 
Shellsort, also known as Shell sort or Shell's method, is an in-place comparison sort. It can be seen as either a generalization of sorting by… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1970-2017
02419702017

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2011
2011
In this article, we describe a randomized Shellsort algorithm. This algorithm is a simple, randomized, data-oblivious version of… (More)
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2010
2010
In this paper, we describe a randomized Shellsort algorithm. This algorithm is a simple, randomized, data-oblivious version of… (More)
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2000
2000
We demonstrate an Ω(<italic>pn</italic><supscrpt>1+1/<italic>p </italic>) lower bound on the average-case running time (uniform… (More)
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1999
1999
We prove a general lower bound on the average-case complexity of Shellsort: the average number of data-movements (and comparisons… (More)
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1999
1999
The recent popularity of genetic algorithms (GA's) and their application to a wide variety of problems is a result of their ease… (More)
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1997
1997
A perturbation technique can be used to simplify and sharpen A. C. Yao's theorems about the behavior of shellsort with increments… (More)
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1997
1997
We show lower bounds on the worst-case complexity of Shellsort. In particular, we give a fairly simple proof of an (n lg 2 n=(lg… (More)
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1996
1996
We consider the worst-case running time of Shellsort when only a constant number,c, of increments are allowed. Forc=3, we show… (More)
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1992
1992
We give improved lower bounds for Shellsort based on a new and relatively simple proof idea. The lower bounds obtained are both… (More)
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1983
1983
The running time of Shellsort, with the number of passes restricted to O(log N), was thought for some time to be Θ(N3/2), due to… (More)
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