SPAA

Known as: Symposium on Parallel Algorithms and Architectures 
SPAA, the ACM Symposium on Parallelism in Algorithms and Architectures, is an academic conference in the fields of parallel computing and distributed… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1991-2018
0519912018

Papers overview

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Review
2017
Review
2017
The 29th ACM Symposium on Parallelism in Algorithms and Architectures (SPAA 2017) was held on July 24 26, 2017 in Washington D.C… (More)
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Review
2008
Review
2008
The 20th ACM Symposium on Parallelism in Algorithms and Architectures, SPAA 2008, was held in Munich, Germany, between June 14… (More)
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2008
2008
In the dynamic load balancing problem, we seek to keep the job load roughly evenly distributed among the processors of a given… (More)
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2005
2005
An interactive composition for flute and computer is presented, entitled SPAA. This piece uses an interactive composition… (More)
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2000
2000
This paper addresses optimal mapping of parallel programs composed of a chain of data parallel tasks onto the processors of a… (More)
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1999
1999
The papers in this special issue are archival versions of working papers presented at the Eighth ACM Symposium on Parallel… (More)
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1998
1998
Modern shared memory implementations use many complex, interacting optimizations, forcing<lb>industrial product groups to spend… (More)
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1997
1997
In this paper we consider the problem of interprocessor communication on parallel computers that have optical communication… (More)
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1996
1996
We study the problem of constructing a sorting network that is tolerant to faults and whose running time (i.e., depth) is as… (More)
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