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Rhizobium galegae

Known as: Neorhizobium galegae 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2019
2019
The toxic legume plant, Galega officinalis, is native to the Eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea regions. This legume is… Expand
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2017
2017
Cowpea derives most of its N nutrition from biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) via symbiotic bacteroids in root nodules. In Sub… Expand
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2015
2015
BackgroundThe symbiotic phenotype of Neorhizobium galegae, with strains specifically fixing nitrogen with either Galega… Expand
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2003
2003
This paper explores the relationship between the genetic diversity of rhizobia and the morphological diversity of their plant… Expand
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2003
2003
Summary Bioremediation potential of the nitrogen-fixing leguminous plant Galega orientalis Lam. and its microsymbiont Rhizobium… Expand
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2002
2002
List of original papers This thesis is based on the following articles, which in the text will be referred to by their Roman… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
AFLP fingerprints of Rhizobium galegae strains that infect Galega orientalis and Galega officinalis obtained from different… Expand
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2001
2001
Twenty-six Rhizobium galegae strains, representing the center of origin of the host plants Galega orientalis and G. officinalis… Expand
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1999
1999
Plants of goat's rue (Galega orientalis) inoculated with Rhizobium galegae strain HAMBI 540 were grown in the presence of… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
The nitrogen-fixing rhizobial symbionts of Sesbania herbacea growing in the nature reserve at the Sierra de Huautla, Mexico, were… Expand
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