Prunus cerasus

Known as: Sour Cherry, Cherries, Pie, Cherries, Sour 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1946-2017
0102019462016

Papers overview

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2008
2008
Many edible plant metabolites are known to be useful as cellular antioxidants. In the search for antioxidative chemicals from… (More)
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2006
2006
The transition from self-incompatibility (SI) to self-compatibility (SC) is regarded as one of the most prevalent transitions in… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The identification of phenolics from various cultivars of fresh sweet and sour cherries and their protective effects on neuronal… (More)
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2004
2004
In the recent years many studies on anthocyanins have revealed their strong antioxidant activity and their possible use as… (More)
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2004
2004
The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) has increased in the United States and more patients are seeking CAM… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
This study describes a novel F-box protein gene in the S-locus of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) and sweet cherry (P. avium). The… (More)
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2002
2002
Gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) typically "breaks down" due to polyploidy in many Solanaceous species, resulting in self… (More)
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Anthocyanins from tart cherries, Prunus cerasus L. (Rosaceae) cv. Balaton and Montmorency; sweet cherries, Prunus avium L… (More)
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1999
1999
Montmorency and Balaton tart cherries were lyophilized and sequentially extracted with hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol… (More)
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1999
1999
As indicated by an Fe(II)-induced liposome peroxidation bioassay, the EtOAc extract of tart cherries (Prunus cerasus) was found… (More)
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