Pronator teres muscle structure

Known as: Pronator teres, Pronator teres muscle, M. pronator teres 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1941-2018
0102019412017

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2004
2004
BACKGROUND Previous studies have indicated that the demands placed on the medial ulnar collateral ligament of the elbow when it… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
We hypothesized that muscles crossing the elbow have fundamental differences in their capacity for excursion, force generation… (More)
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1996
1996
The pronator quadratus muscle has been neglected to a great extent in the anatomical and functional literature. This study… (More)
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
We hypothesized that the moment arms of muscles crossing the elbow vary substantially with forearm and elbow position and that… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
The architectural features of twenty-one different forearm muscles (n = 154 total muscles) were studied. Muscles included the… (More)
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1992
1992
Electromyography and high-speed film were used to examine the muscle activity in the elbows of pitchers with medial collateral… (More)
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Highly Cited
1989
Highly Cited
1989
1. We studied the patterns of electromyographic (EMG) activity in elbow muscles of 14 normal human subjects. The activity of five… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
Highly Cited
1986
Functional instability, i.e., recurrent sprains or a feeling of "giving way" of the ankle, is common after ankle sprains. These… (More)
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1981
1981
Thirty-nine patients with a clinical diagnosis of the pronator teres syndrome were seen during a seven-year period. They… (More)
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1979
1979
We describe a patient who complained of jerking of the right forearm on writing. Active pronation of his arm produced several… (More)
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