Personal software process

Known as: PSP (disambiguation) 
The personal software process (PSP) is a structured software development process that is intended (planned) to help software engineers better… (More)
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2005
2005
The personal software process (PSP) is a process and performance improvement method aimed at individual software engineers. The… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Measures represent important data in all engineering disciplines. This data allows engineers to understand how things work and… (More)
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2002
2002
ix 1 Software Quality 1 2 How the PSP Was Developed 3 3 The Principles of the PSP 5 4 The PSP Process Structure 7 4.1 PSP… (More)
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2000
2000
In recent years, a growing number of software organizations have begun to focus on applying the concepts of statistical process… (More)
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2000
2000
Process improvements within software development occur at three different levels: the organizational level, the project/team… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Anecdotal and qualitative evidence from industry indicates that two programmers working side-by-side at one computer… (More)
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1998
1998
In 1995, Watts Humphrey introduced the Personal Software Process in his book, A Discipline for Software Engineering (Addison… (More)
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1997
1997
Objectives This seminar describes a personal software process (PSP). A framework is introduced for statistically managed software… (More)
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1995
1995
The personal software process (PSP) has been developed by the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) to address the improvement… (More)
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1989
1989
1. The Need As software systems become larger, more complex, and more demanding, we need to improve the quality and productivity… (More)
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