Null Allele

A mutation that results in either no gene product or the absence of function at the phenotypic level.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1967-2018
02040608019672018

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
Although microsatellites are a very efficient tool for many population genetics applications, they may occasionally produce "null… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Microsatellite null alleles are commonly encountered in population genetics studies, yet little is known about their impact on… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Brassinosteroids regulate plant growth and development through a protein complex that includes the leucine-rich repeat receptor… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Targeted mutagenesis was used to produce two mutations in the murine hemochromatosis gene (Hfe) locus. The first mutation deletes… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Glucokinase (GK) gene mutations cause diabetes mellitus in both humans and mouse models, but the pathophysiological basis is only… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Insulin action is viewed as a set of branching pathways, with some actions serving to regulate energy metabolism and others to… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Ocular retardation (or) is a murine eye mutation causing microphthalmia, a thin hypocellular retina and optic nerve aplasia. Here… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
Twenty-three (AC)n repeat markers from chromosome 16 were typed in the parents of the 40 CEPH (Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
Mutations in the p53 tumour-suppressor gene are the most frequently observed genetic lesions in human cancers. To investigate the… (More)
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