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Line clipping

Known as: Fast clipping, Fast-clipping 
In computer graphics, line clipping is the process of removing lines or portions of lines outside an area of interest. Typically, any line or part… Expand
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Papers overview

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2007
2007
This paper introduces a universal algorithm for polygon clipping, which is a frequent operation in GIS. In the proposed solution… Expand
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2003
2003
A new algorithm of line clipping for convex polygons with n edges is proposed. Comparing the new algorithm and Cyrus-Beck… Expand
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2002
2002
Based on the scanline algorithm, a fast clipping algorithm of polygon is presented. Compared to the existing clipping algorithm… Expand
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1996
1996
Abstract A new algorithm for line clipping by convex polygon with O(1) processing complexity is presented. It is based on dual… Expand
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1994
1994
Abstract A new O ( lg N ) line clipping algorithm in E 2 against a convex window is presented. The main advantage of the… Expand
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1993
1993
VACLAV SKALA Department of Informatics and Computer Science, University of West Bohemia, Americkfi 42, Box 314, 306 14 Plzefi… Expand
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1992
1992
One of the classical problems of Computer Graphics: line clipping against a rectangle is revisited. Coordinate raster refinement… Expand
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1990
1990
Abstract Sutherland-Cohn algorithm is the most widely used line clipping algorithm. The major time consumed in this method comes… Expand
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Highly Cited
1984
Highly Cited
1984
A new concept and method for line clipping is developed that describes clipping in an exact and mathematical form. The basic… Expand
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