LIG4 gene

Known as: DNA joinase, DNA repair enzyme, LIG4 
This gene plays a critical role in the regulation of nonhomologous DNA end joining and in V(D)J recombination.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other… (More)
Is this relevant?
2010
2010
PURPOSE Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive type of glioma and has the poorest survival. However, a small… (More)
Is this relevant?
2007
2007
Cells of higher eukaryotes rejoin double strand breaks (DSBs) in their DNA predominantly by a non-homologous DNA end joining… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
The double-strand break DNA repair pathway has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis. We evaluated the association between 19… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 3
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were searched for in 36 genes involved in diverse DNA repair pathways, and 50… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
We performed genetic association studies in a population-based breast cancer case-control study analysing polymorphisms in genes… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Somatic genetic alterations in tumors are known to correlate with survival, but little is known about the prognostic significance… (More)
  • table 1
  • table 2
  • figure 1
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
DNA ligase IV functions in DNA nonhomologous end-joining and V(D)J recombination. Four patients with features including… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
DNA ligase IV (LIG4) is a nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) protein used for V(D)J recombination and DNA repair. In mice, Lig4… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Cancer progression is often associated with the accumulation of gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs), such as translocations… (More)
Is this relevant?