IBM 650

Known as: IBM 653, Symbolic Optimal Assembly Program 
The IBM 650 Magnetic Drum Data-Processing Machine is one of IBM's early computers, and the world’s first mass-produced computer. It was announced in… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1953-2016
05101519532015

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2007
2007
In 1959, two Stanford undergraduate electrical engineering students enrolled in Math 139, theory and operation of computing… (More)
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1989
1989
This article focuses on the birth of the IBM France company in 1914; the proposal its directors made to buy out Bull, its main… (More)
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1986
1986
How does one summarize the personal reminiscences of another of the giants in the computer field? Don Knuth is also an artist, of… (More)
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1986
1986
Dartmouth project and would have learned of IPL-II there if not before. Herbert Stoyan (1956-1959) has In view of the current… (More)
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1986
1986
Galler refers to the IBM Educational Grant Plan in his and universities in the western states. George Brown paper. For many years… (More)
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1986
1986
As stated earlier, Kubie and Trimble were the first members of the Mathematics Planning Group of Applied Science in Endicott, New… (More)
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Review
1986
Review
1986
Herriot traces the history of computing at Stanford University, beginning with the IBM CPC and extending through the life of the… (More)
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1960
1960
The program described here represents an a t tempt by the auihor to produce for the 650 an assembly program similar in s t… (More)
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1957
1957
Feature of the IBM 650 RAMAC important to "in-line" processing is the facility for quick access to the data processing system… (More)
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1956
1956
The IBM Type 650 is a stored-program magnetic drum calculator, with input and output on (separate) punch cards. The memory… (More)
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