Glioblastoma, IDH-Mutant

Known as: Secondary Glioblastoma, Secondary Glioblastoma Multiforme, Secondary Glioblastoma, IDH-Mutant 
A glioblastoma arising from a lower grade astrocytoma. It is more commonly seen in younger patients and is associated with IDH1 or IDH2 gene… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2017
Review
2017
The identification of heterozygous mutations in the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) in subsets of cancers… (More)
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Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
Studies of gene rearrangements and the consequent oncogenic fusion proteins have laid the foundation for targeted cancer therapy… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Recent studies have shown that isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 (IDH1/2) mutations occur frequently in secondary glioblastoma. This… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Mutations in the gene isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) are present in up to 86% of grade II and III gliomas and secondary… (More)
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Highly Cited
2009
Highly Cited
2009
PURPOSE To establish the frequency of IDH1 mutations in glioblastomas at a population level, and to assess whether they allow… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Glioblastoma is classified into two subtypes on the basis of clinical history: "primary glioblastoma" arising de novo without… (More)
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Review
2005
Review
2005
  • Hiroko Ohgaki
  • Neuropathology : official journal of the Japanese…
  • 2005
Glioblastomas, the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, may develop de novo (primary glioblastoma) or by progression… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Astrocytomas are the leading cause of brain cancer in humans. Because these tumours are highly infiltrative, current treatments… (More)
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Review
1999
Review
1999
Glioblastomas may develop de novo (primary glioblastomas) or through progression from low-grade or anaplastic astrocytomas… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Glioblastoma multiforme, the most malignant human brain tumor, may develop de novo (primary glioblastoma) or through progression… (More)
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