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Dendrobatidae

National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Abstract The evidentiary basis of the currently accepted classification of living amphibians is discussed and shown not to… Expand
Review
2005
Review
2005
A diverse array of biologically active, lipid-soluble alkaloids have been discovered in amphibian skin. Such alkaloids include… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Defensive mechanisms, including noxious or toxic substances, are favored by predation‐driven natural selection. The acquisition… Expand
Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
SUMMARY Poison frogs in the anuran family Dendrobatidae use bright colors on their bodies to advertise toxicity. The species… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
The poison frogs (family Dendrobatidae) are terrestrial anuran amphibians displaying a wide range of coloration and toxicity… Expand
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
An analysis of partial sequences of the 16S ribosomal rRNA gene (582 bp) of 20 poison frog species (Dendrobatidae) confirmed… Expand
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Highly Cited
1994
Highly Cited
1994
The skin of poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) contains a wide variety of alkaloids that presumably serve a defensive role. These… Expand
Review
1987
Review
1987
Cutaneous granular glands are a shared character of adult amphibians, including caecilians, and are thought to be the source of… Expand
Highly Cited
1979
Highly Cited
1979
The granular glands of nine species of dendrobatid frogs were examined using light and electron microscopy. The glands are… Expand
Highly Cited
1978
Highly Cited
1978
Abstract Dendrobatid frogs have evolved an imposing number of unique alkaloids, apparently as a chemical defense against… Expand