Definite clause grammar

Known as: DCG 
A definite clause grammar (DCG) is a way of expressing grammar, either for natural or formal languages, in a logic programming language such as… (More)
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2015
2015
  • Klaus. Daessler
  • 2015
This technical report (TR) is an optional part of the International Standard for Prolog, ISO/IEC 13211. Prolog manufacturers… (More)
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2014
2014
  • Björn Dagerman
  • 2014
Services that rely on the semantic computations of users’ natural linguistic inputs are becoming more frequent. Computing… (More)
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2013
2013
In this paper, we introduce experiment results of a Vietnamese sentence parser which is built by using the Chomsky’s… (More)
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1994
1994
This paper describes the first reported grammatical framework for a nmltimodal interface. Although multimodal interfaces offer… (More)
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1990
1990
Definite Clause Grammars (DCGs) have proved valuable to computational linguists since they can be used to specify phrase… (More)
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1990
1990
Arabic has some special syntax features which lead to complex syntax structures. We have developed a formal description of Arabic… (More)
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1989
1989
Programming in a purely applicative style implies that all information is passed in arguments. However, in practice the number of… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
1985
1985
This paper reports a completed stage of ongoing research at the University oF York. Landsbergen's advocacy of analytical inverses… (More)
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Review
1980
Review
1980
A clear andpowerfulformalism for describing languages, both natural and artificial, follows f iom a method for expressing… (More)
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