Angelica sinensis

Known as: sinenses, Angelica, Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels, dong gui 
A plant species of the family APIACEAE that is the source of dong quai.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2011
2011
Danggui, also known as Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (Apiaceae), has been used in Chinese medicine to treat menstrual disorders… (More)
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2010
2010
BACKGROUND Dozens of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) formulas have been used for promotion of "blood production" for centuries… (More)
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2009
2009
Bioassay-guided fractionation of the chloroform extract from the roots of Angelica sinensis led to isolation and characterization… (More)
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2008
2008
OBJECTIVE To study the chemical constituents of Angelica sinensis. METHOD The constituents were separated by chromatographic… (More)
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2008
2008
Following chemotaxonomic evidence, the PE and CHCl(3) extracts of the roots of the botanical Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels… (More)
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2007
2007
An analytical method of high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) was developed to simultaneously separate and identify… (More)
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2006
2006
Serotonin receptor (5-HT(7)) binding assay-directed fractionation of a methanol extract of the dried roots of Angelica sinensis… (More)
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2006
2006
The naturally-occurring compound, n-butylidenephthalide (BP), which is isolated from the chloroform extract of Angelica sinensis… (More)
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2003
2003
AIM To study the effect of angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) on immunological colon injury and its mechanisms in rats… (More)
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1994
1994
A low molecular weight polysaccharide has been isolated from the rhizome of Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels (Umbelliferaer). It… (More)
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