triphenyl bismuth

Known as: Ph3Bi, triphenyl bismuthine, triphenylbismuth 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1992-2017
02419922017

Papers overview

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2016
2016
This study investigates the possibility of detecting relativistic effects and electron correlation in single-crystal X-ray… (More)
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2015
2015
Long-term use of intravenous bisphosphonates, such as zoledronic acid (zoledronate), has been linked to bisphosphonate-related… (More)
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2012
2012
Relativistic effects in triphenylbismuth have been investigated using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. The… (More)
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2011
2011
The photolytic decomposition of triphenylbismuth and di-tert-butyl diselenide under aqueous micellar conditions yields 5-nm… (More)
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2005
2005
Radiopaque cement containing barium sulfate causes significantly more bone resorption in vivo and in vitro than radiolucent… (More)
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2003
2003
Self-curing acrylic bone cements are widely used in the fixation of prosthetic implants in orthopaedic surgery. Commercial bone… (More)
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2002
2002
In a joint replacement surgery it is vital for bone cement to be radiologically detectable. Consequently, heavy metal salts of… (More)
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2002
2002
The biomedical and industrial uses of organobismuth compounds have become widespread, although there is limited information… (More)
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1996
1996
Previously we demonstrated the feasibility of using up to 24% triphenylbismuth (TPB) as a radiopaque, monomer-miscible additive… (More)
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1992
1992
Triphenyl bismuth (Ph3Bi) is a promising new additive for making biomedical resins visible on x-ray images. We evaluated the… (More)
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