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robinetinidol

 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2018
Review
2018
The bark of Acacia mearnsii De Wild. (black wattle) contains significant amounts of water-soluble components acalled “wattle… Expand
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2015
2015
Robinetinidol-(4β,2')-tetrahydroxy-flavone (RBF) is an oligomeric condensed polyphenol that has been shown to exhibit anti… Expand
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2015
2015
Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Benth. (Leguminosae) is an evergreen tree widely distributed in the greater part of India. Locally… Expand
2012
2012
Quebracho (Schinopsis lorentzii and Schinopsis balansae) extract is an important source of natural polymers for leather tanning… Expand
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Wattle (Acacia mearnsii) bark extract is an important renewable industrial source of natural polymers for leather tanning and… Expand
Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Acacia polyphenol (AP) extracted from the bark of the black wattle tree (Acacia meansii) is rich in unique catechin-like flavan-3… Expand
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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
The bark extract of Acacia mearnsii showed strong lipase and α-amylase inhibition activities. Fractionation of the extract by… Expand
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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Acacia polyphenol (AP) extracted from the bark of the black wattle tree (Acacia mearnsii) is rich in unique catechin-like flavan… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
2011
2011
The proanthocyanidins of Acaciella angustissima (Mill.) Britton & Rose foliage have antinutritional and antimicrobial effects as… Expand
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