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phosphorite

National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Sulfur bacteria such as Beggiatoa or Thiomargarita have a particularly high capacity for storage because of their large size. In… Expand
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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
Abstract Orthochemical sediments associated with Neoproterozoic glaciation have prominence beyond their volumetric proportions… Expand
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Abstract The Pucara Basin of Peru is an elongate trough that subsided landward of a NNW-trending structural high during the Late… Expand
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
A record of sedimentary, authigenic, and biological processes are preserved within the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Alhisa… Expand
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Review
2000
Review
2000
Abstract The cycling of phosphorus (P) in the ocean has long been viewed from a geological perspective that tends to focus on… Expand
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1998
1998
Previously described organic-rich shale facies of the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation at Soda Springs, Idaho… Expand
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Highly Cited
1985
Highly Cited
1985
................................................................................................................................................................ 5 l . I ntroduction .......................................................................................................................................................... 5 I. l The scope of the study ...................................................................................................... .............................. 5 1 .2 Previous work ............................................. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1 .3 The investigated localities .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1 .4 Sedimentological methods ..... .......................................................................................... .............................. 7 1 .5 Paleontological material and methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2. Regional stratigraphy of the conglomerate and adjacent strata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 2 . 1 General features of the Brentskardhaugen Bed ............................................................... . ............................. 8 2 .2 Description of the Marhøgda Bed .................. . . ................................................................ ............................. 9 2.3 Festningen area ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2 .4 Diabasodden area ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2 . 5 Brentskardet area ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2 .6 Agardhbukta area ........ ......................................................... .......................................................................... 1 4 3 . Fossil content and age ............................................................. ................................................ .............................. 1 5 3 . 1 Ammonites and Belemnites ........................................................................................................................... 1 5 3 .2 Bivalves ........................................................................................................................................................... 1 5 3 .3 Brachiopods ......................................................................................................................... .......................... 1 5 3.4 Dinoflagellates ................................................................................................................. .............................. 1 5 3 . 5 Faunal comparisons ....................................................................................................................................... 1 5 3 .6 Age of the Brentskardhaugen Bed and adjacent strata ..................................................... ............................. 1 7 4 . Pebble content and orig in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 4 . 1 Phosphorite pebbles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 4.2 Chert pebbles .................................................................................................................................................. 24 4.3 Quartz pebbles ................................................................................................................................................ 25 5 . The matrix of the conglomerate ............................................................................................................................ 25 6. Origin of the Marhøgda Bed ................................................................................................... . ... .... ...................... 25 7 . Concluding remarks on depositional history ....................................................................................................... 25 7 . 1 Source of pebbles ........................................................................................................................................... 25 7 .2 The Ladinian Pliensbachian interval ........................................................................... ... ........................... 25 7.3 The Toarcian Bajocian interval ................................................................................................................. 26 7 .4 The Bathonian Cal lovian interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 8. Paleontological part ................................................................................................................ .... .......................... 28 8 . 1 I ntroductory notes ........................... .......................................................... ..................................................... 28 8.2 List of descriptions ............................................................................................................... .......................... 29 8.3 Brachiopoda ..................................................................................................................... .... .......................... 30 8.4 Bivalvia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 8 .5 Ammonoidea .................................................................................................................................................. 36 8.6 Decapoda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1 Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 �� .......................................................................................................................................................................... � Authors' address: Sven A. Backstra m Statoil P. O. Box 300 N-400 1 Stavanger Norway Present: Saga Petroleum als P. O. Box 9 N1 322 Høvik Norway lena Nagy Institute of Geology University of Oslo P. O. Box 1 047, Blindern Osl03 Norway 
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Highly Cited
1981
Highly Cited
1981
Many models of the origin of marine phosphorites require a sediment rich in organic matter, which by decomposition releases… Expand
Highly Cited
1978
Highly Cited
1978
Phosphorite concretions have been detected in the kidneys of two widespread species of mollusks, Mercenaria mercenaria and… Expand
1978
1978
THE uranium-series method of absolute age determination has been widely applied to the radiometric geochronology of fossil coral… Expand