ZAP70 gene

Known as: ZAP70, STD, SRK 
This gene is involved in tyrosine phosphorylation and T-cell activation.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1992-2018
0102019922018

Papers overview

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2008
2008
The status of the immune system of patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is not yet sufficiently… (More)
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2006
2006
The clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is heterogeneous with some patients requiring early… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
BACKGROUND Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a heterogeneous disease; many patients never need treatment, whereas some have… (More)
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2000
2000
Src family tyrosine kinases play a key role in T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling. They are responsible for the initial… (More)
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1998
1998
The Syk/ZAP-70 family of protein tyrosine kinases is indispensable for normal lymphoid development. Syk is necessary for the… (More)
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1997
1997
An early stage in thymocyte development, after rearrangement of the beta chain genes of the T cell receptor (TCR), involves… (More)
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1997
1997
Activation-induced cell death (AICD) is initiated by the TCR-dependent up-regulation of Fas ligand (FasL) mRNA. The subsequently… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Two families of tyrosine kinases, the Src and Syk families, are required for T-cell receptor activation. While the Src kinases… (More)
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1996
1996
The protein tyrosine kinase ZAP-70 plays an essential role in T-cell activation and development. After T-cell receptor… (More)
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Highly Cited
1995
Highly Cited
1995
During thymic development, T cells that can recognize foreign antigen in association with self major histocompatibility complex… (More)
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